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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Use of Nematodes for Post Harvest Control of Navel Orangeworm (Amyelois Transitella) in Fallen Pistachios

Authors
item Siegel, Joel
item Noble, Patricia
item Lacey, Lawrence
item Bentley, Walter - UNIVERSITY OF CA
item Higbee, Bradley - PARAMOUNT FARMING

Submitted to: California Pistachio Industry Annual Report
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 13, 2004
Publication Date: July 13, 2004
Citation: Siegel, J.P., Noble, P.M., Lacey, L.A., Bentley, W., Higbee, B.S. 2004. Use of nematodes for post harvest control of navel orangeworm (amyelois transitella) in fallen pistachios. California Pistachio Industry Annual Report, Crop Year 2003-2004. p. 113-114.

Interpretive Summary: The ability of two species of insect pathogenic nematodes to control the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella, was investigated in a series of small plot studies. Steinernema carpocapsae consistently and effectively controlled navel orangeworm larvae and was effective when applied over pistachio leaves. The efficacy of a second nematode species, S. feltiae, was variable and it was less effective when applied at the same concentration as S. carpocapsae. A sanitation treatment employing nematodes would be most effective in the winter or early spring when most nuts are on the ground and the soil is moist. Treatments were effective when the maximum soil temperature was below 90°F but above freezing. The current cost of S. carpocapsae is approximately 75$ per billion nematodes and at a concentration of 65 nematodes applied per square inch the cost per acre of material is approximately $30.00. Future studies are necessary to determine if lower concentrations are effective as well as whether the nematodes can be concentrated on the berm.

Technical Abstract: The ability of two species of insect pathogenic nematodes to control the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella, was investigated in a series of studies. Steinernema carpocapsae consistently and effectively controlled navel orangeworm larvae in small plot trials and was effective when applied over pistachio leaves. The efficacy of a second nematode species, S. feltiae, was variable and it was less effective when applied at the same concentration as S. carpocapsae. A sanitation treatment employing nematodes would be most effective in the winter or early spring when most nuts are on the ground and the soil is moist. Treatments were effective when the maximum soil temperature was below 90°F but above freezing. Nematodes were ineffective when applied during July. The current cost of S. carpocapsae is approximately 75$ per billion nematodes and at a concentration of 65 nematodes applied per square inch the cost per acre of material is approximately $30.00. Future studies are necessary to determine if lower concentrations are effective as well as whether the nematodes can be concentrated on the berm.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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