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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Selenium Concentration and Distribution in Range Forages from Four Locations in the Northern Great Plains

Authors
item Lawler, T - NDSU-FARGO
item Taylor, Joshua
item Grings, Elaine
item Finley, John
item Caton, J - NDSU-FARGO

Submitted to: Research Update for Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2002
Publication Date: January 15, 2003
Citation: Lawler, T.J., Taylor, J.B., Grings, E.E., Finley, J.W., Caton, J. 2003. Selenium concentration and distribution in range forages from four locations in the northern great plains. Research Update for Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory p. 82. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: Previous research has shown anticarcinogenic properties associated with supranutritonal levels of selenium supplementation for humans. It has been suggested that the antioxidative properties of selenium might be one mechanism for cancer reductions. Beef, on the average, is the single greatest contributor to human dietary selenium in North America. Geographical region and soil selenium concentrations have been reported to be useful in predicting selenium concentrations of beef. The objectives of this study were to assess selenium concentration in diet versus available forage and to evaluate the distribution of selenium in forage fractions across the grazing season. Selenium concentrations were not different between masticate and total grass samples within each location. Selenium concentrations were also not different between grass stem and grass leaf. Seasonal changes in forage selenium were inconsistent across seasons at the different locations. Additional forage samples have been collected and should provide further insight into seasonal changes in forage selenium concentrations.

Technical Abstract: Previous research has shown anticarcinogenic properties associated with supranutritonal levels of selenium supplementation for humans. It has been suggested that the antioxidative properties of selenium might be one mechanism for cancer reductions. Beef, on the average, is the single greatest contributor to human dietary selenium in North America. Geographical region and soil selenium concentrations have been reported to be useful in predicting selenium concentrations of beef. The objectives of this study were to assess selenium concentration in diet versus available forage and to evaluate the distribution of selenium in forage fractions across the grazing season. Selenium concentrations were not different between masticate and total grass samples within each location. Selenium concentrations were also not different between grass stem and grass leaf. Seasonal changes in forage selenium were inconsistent across seasons at the different locations. Additional forage samples have been collected and should provide further insight into seasonal changes in forage selenium concentrations.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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