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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Planting Method and Timing Effects on Sugarcane Yield

Authors
item Viator, Ryan
item Garrison, Donnie
item Dufrene, Edwis
item Tew, Thomas
item Richard Jr, Edward

Submitted to: Crop Management at www.cropmanagement.org
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 17, 2005
Publication Date: June 21, 2005
Citation: Viator, R.P., Garrison, D.D., Dufrene Jr, E.O., Tew, T.L., Richard Jr, E.P. 2005. Planting Method and Timing Effects on Sugarcane Yield. Crop Management. Available online: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/pub/cm/research/2005/sugarcane

Interpretive Summary: Sugarcane is propagated from vegetative stalk cuttings either as whole-stalks (four to eight feet) or as billets (20-24 inches) from plantings made in August through October. This research was conducted to determine if planting method and planting date affects yields of different varieties in Louisiana. Cane and sugar yields from billet and whole-stalk plantings were inconsistent, and no clear trends were observed. The August planting date had higher cane and sugar yields than the September and October plantings. This data suggest that producers should attempt to plant the majority of their crop in August to maximize yields and should be aware that billet planting may give inconsistent yields.

Technical Abstract: Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) in Louisiana is propagated from vegetative plantings in late summer and early fall as either whole-stalks with 4 to 8 nodal buds or stalk pieces (billets) with 2 to 4 buds. This research was conducted to determine if planting method and planting date affects yields of the varieties currently grown in Louisiana. Billet planting was compared to whole-stalk planting at three planting dates (August 15, September 15, and October 15) for 2 years with three different varieties (LCP 85-384, HoCP 85-845, and HoCP 95-555). Cane and sugar yields were compared in plant-cane and first-ratoon production years. When compared to whole-stalk planting, cane and sugar yields from billet planting were inconsistent, and no clear trends were observed. Averaged across varieties and planting method, the August planting date had higher cane and sugar yields than the September and October plantings. There was no planting method by variety interaction, indicating that all varieties responded similarly to billet and whole stalk planting. Our data suggest that farmers should attempt to plant the majority of their crop in August to maximize yields and should be aware that billet planting may give inconsistent yields.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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