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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of Food-Grade Dent Corn Hybrids for Fusarium Ear Rot and Fumonisin Accumulations in Grain

Authors
item Kleinschmidt, C - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Clements, Michael
item Maragos, Chris
item Pataky, J - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item White, D - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 22, 2004
Publication Date: March 1, 2004
Citation: Kleinschmidt, C.E., Clements, M.J., Maragos, C.M., Pataky, J.K., White, D.G. 2005. Evaluation of food-grade dent corn hybrids for severity of Fusarium ear rot and fumonisin accumulations in grain. Plant Disease. 89:291-297.

Interpretive Summary: Fumonisins are toxic compounds associated with a prevalent disease in U.S. corn fileds, Fusarium ear and kernel rot. Researchers have demonstrated a link between consumption of fumonisin contaminated corn grain and detrimental effects on animal health. Some evidence also suggests a potential association between consumption of fumonisins and detrimental effects on human health. We evaluated 68 food-grade dent corn hybrids for resistance or susceptibility to Fusarium ear rot and fumonisin accumulation in grain in 2000 and 2001. Twenty-six hybrids identified as resistant or susceptible to fumonisin accumulation in grain in 2000 were evaluated at three additional locations in 2001. Several hybrids were identified in all trials that produce grain with low fumonisin concentration. These hybrids should be useful for the production of corn-based human food products.

Technical Abstract: Fumonisins (produced by Fusarium verticillioides (Syn = F. moniliforme), and F. proliferatum) have been associated with potentially serious toxicoses of animals and humans. We evaluated 68 food-grade dent corn hybrids for resistance or susceptibility to Fusarium ear rot and fumonisin accumulation in grain in inoculated trials in 2000 and 2001. Twenty-six hybrids identified as resistant or susceptible to fumonisin accumulation in grain in 2000 were re-evaluated in non-inoculated trials at three locations in 2001. Fumonisin concentrations in grain from inoculated and naturally infected trials were compared to determine if our inoculation technique correctly differentiates hybrids classified as resistant or susceptible in natural infection. Environmental differences greatly affected hybrid performance related to Fusarium ear rot severity and fumonisin accumulation in grain, therefore, hybrids should be evaluated in multiple, inoculated trials. Hybrids identified as resistant with inoculation also should be re-evaluated in non-inoculated, multi-environment trials from which insect damage, drought tolerance, husk and silk characteristics, or other data are collected. Hybrids were identified that produce grain with low fumonisin concentration in inoculated and naturally infected trials. These hybrids should be useful for the production of corn-based human food products.

Last Modified: 12/17/2014
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