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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Bacterial Contamination of Poultry As a Risk to Human Health

Authors
item Cox, Nelson
item Richardson, Larry
item Bailey, Joseph
item Cosby, Douglas
item Cason Jr, John
item Musgrove, Michael
item Mead, G - RETIRED

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2004
Publication Date: August 1, 2005
Citation: Cox Jr, N.A., Richardson, L.J., Bailey, J.S., Cosby, D.E., Cason Jr, J.A., Musgrove, M.T., Mead, G.C. 2005. Bacterial contamination of poultry as a risk to human health. Book Chapter. In: Food Safety Control in the Poultry Industry. Ed. G. C. Mead. Ch 2. p. 21-43.

Interpretive Summary: Campylobacter, Clostridium, Listeria, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Escherichia coli and Yersinia are important pathogens associated with poultry. These organisms can be readily found on poultry and poultry related operations. In this study, we wanted to provide a brief history of each of the above mentioned foodborne organisms, provide information on the prevalence of each of these organisms in different segments of poultry and provide possible intervention strategies and critical control points in commercial poultry.

Technical Abstract: Bacteria present on poultry can be divided into two groups: (1) pathogenic (those capable of producing disease in humans) and (2) nonpathogenic (those not previously associated with a recognized disease). Many of the microorganisms in the nonpathogenic group are of concern because of their spoilage capabilities. In this chapter the following foodborne pathogens will be discussed in detail: Campylobacter, Clostridium, Listeria, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Escherichia coli and Yersinia. Human foodborne illness from the above mentioned organisms has been shown to be due mainly to cross-contamination by mishandling of raw poultry or consumption of undercooked poultry meat. The estimated annual incidence of a foodborne illness associated with these organisms ranges from 4 to 8 million cases in the United States. The objectives of this chapter is (1) provide a brief history of each of the above mentioned foodborne organisms (2) provide information on the prevalence of each of these organisms in different segments of poultry and (3) provide possible intervention strategies and critical control points in commercial poultry.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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