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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Setting a Bad Example for Emerging Pathogens: Influenza and Molecular Mechanisms of Host Restriction and Pathogenicity Shifts

Author
item Spackman, Erica

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 15, 2004
Publication Date: October 1, 2004
Citation: Spackman, E. 2004. Setting a Bad Example For Emerging Pathogens: Influenza and Molecular Mechanisms of Host Restriction and Pathogenicity Shifts. Meeting Abstract. October, 2004.

Technical Abstract: Although influenza has been around for probably hundreds of years, because the virus has the ability to occasionally transmit to new host species and change in virulence, it is often regarded as an emerging virus. The molecular characteristics for influenza host restriction is partially understood, however it is not possible to predict whether any given influenza strain will be able to cross a particular species barrier and cause disease. The mechanisms of viral virulence are also only partially understood. In poultry pathogenicity is probably best understood and is determined by whether an influenza strain can cause a systemic versus localized infection. In mammals, immunopathology may have a role in disease induction. In general one of the most important factors for the virus to be able to cross species is ecological.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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