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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Isolation and Characterization of a Psychrophilic Xylanase Enzyme from Flavobacterium Sp.

Authors
item Lee, Charles
item Smith, Michael
item Kibblewhite, Rena
item Williams, Tina
item Wagschal, Kurt
item Wong, Dominic
item Robertson, George

Submitted to: Current Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 19, 2005
Publication Date: February 1, 2006
Citation: Lee, C.C., Smith, M.R., Accinelli, R., Williams, T.G., Wagschal, K.C., Wong, D., Robertson, G.H. 2006. Isolation and characterization of a psychrophilic xylanase enzyme from flavobacterium sp. Current Microbiology, 52(2):112-116.

Interpretive Summary: Renewable energy demand in the future will only be met if we can utilize biomass sources such as agriculturally derived wastes (straws and bagasse). Critical to successful use of these biomass sources is development of enzymes, such as xylanases, that will break the plant cell wall down into usable fractions. Xylan is a renewable resource that can potentially be used to supply significant portions of our fuel and chemical feedstock needs. Xylanases are enzymes that hydrolyze the xylan substrate in order to make it more readily usable. Industry requires xylanases that have different activity profiles depending on the conditions of any specific process. Thus, there is interest in isolating more xylanases with different activities. We have discovered a xylanase enzyme with high specific activity at cold temperatures. This enzyme might be useful for industrial processes such as baking.

Technical Abstract: Renewable energy demand in the future will only be met if we can utilize biomass sources such as agriculturally derived wastes (straws and bagasse). Critical to successful use of these biomass sources is development of enzymes, such as xylanases, that will break the plant cell wall down into usable fractions. Xylan is a renewable resource that can potentially be used to supply significant portions of our fuel and chemical feedstock needs. Xylanases are enzymes that hydrolyze the xylan substrate in order to make it more readily usable. Industry requires xylanases that have different activity profiles depending on the conditions of any specific process. Thus, there is interest in isolating more xylanases with different activities. We have discovered a xylanase enzyme with high specific activity at cold temperatures. This enzyme might be useful for industrial processes such as baking.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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