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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Laboratory-Scale Fiber An Nonwovens Production of Cotton-Clay Nancomposite

Authors
item White, Leslie
item Delhom, Christopher

Submitted to: Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE)
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: March 12, 2004
Publication Date: July 25, 2004
Citation: White, L.A., Delhom, C.D. 2004. Laboratory-scale fiber an nonwovens production of cotton-clay nancomposite. Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE). v. 91. p532.

Interpretive Summary: Regenerated cellulose nanocomposite fibers have been produced by a wet spinning technique that is a modification of the Lyocell method, which is used for producing regenerated cellulose commercially. The nanocomposite fibers were processed into nonwoven substrates using small scale paper production equipment. Thermal analysis revealed that the nonwoven production process does not hinder the improvements in thermal behavior seen in earlier tests on fibers. Moisture regain analysis showed that the water uptake of these materials is comparable to that of unprocessed cotton, a promising result in the future marketability of these fibers. These nonwoven materials are undergoing traditional textile flammability testing and mechanical testing and scale-up of the fiber production process is in progress.

Technical Abstract: Cotton nanocomposites, fiber modified with organoclays clays, have been developed to improve the thermal properties of cotton with minimal impact on other desirable properties. A method of laboratory scale wet spinning and nonwoven production has been developed; regenerated cellulose nanocomposite fibers have been produced by a wet spinning technique that is a modification of the Lyocell method for producing regenerated cellulose commercially. The nanocomposite fibers were processed into nonwoven substrates using small scale paper production equipment. Thermal analysis revealed that the nonwoven production process does not hinder the improvements in thermal behavior seen in earlier tests on fibers. Moisture regain analysis showed that the water uptake of these materials is comparable to that of unprocessed cotton.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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