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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Stability and Persistence of Aldrin and Methyl-Parathion Resistance in Western Corn Rootworm Populations (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

Authors
item Parimi, Srinivas - MAHARASTRA HYBRID SEED CO
item Meinke, Lance - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item French, Bryan
item Chandler, Laurence
item Siegfried, Blair - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA

Submitted to: Crop Protection Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 29, 2005
Publication Date: March 1, 2006
Citation: Parimi, S., Meinke, L.J., French, B.W., Chandler, L.D., Siegfried, B.D. 2006. Stability and persistence of aldrin and methyl-parathion resistance in western corn rootworm populations (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Crop Protection Journal. 25(3), 269-274.

Interpretive Summary: Laboratory and field collected western corn rootworms were tested for susceptibility to the insecticides methyl-parathion and aldrin to determine the stability of resistance in the absence of selective pressures. Most of the laboratory-reared and field-collected populations were resistant to both insecticides. Average lethal dose (LD50) values of most laboratory and field-collected populations were 19- and 13-fold greater in methyl-parathion bioassays and 204- and 125-fold greater in the aldrin bioassays than the susceptible population. The presence of aldrin and methyl-parathion resistance in field-collected populations suggests that both resistance traits are extremely stable in the absence of selection pressure and that neither mechanism is associated with a strong fitness disadvantage.

Technical Abstract: The susceptibility of laboratory and field collected western corn rootworm populations (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) to methyl-parathion and aldrin were estimated by topical application of insecticide during 2002 to determine the stability of resistance in the absence of selective pressures. Most of the laboratory-reared and field-collected populations were significantly resistant to both insecticides. Average LD50 values of laboratory and field-collected populations were 19- and 13-fold greater than the susceptible population in methyl-parathion bioassays, respectively and 204- and 125-fold greater in the aldrin bioassays, respectively. The presence of aldrin and methyl-parathion resistance in field-collected populations strongly suggests that both resistance traits are extremely stable in the absence of selection pressure and that neither mechanism is associated with a strong fitness disadvantage.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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