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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Foodborne Pathogens in Dairy Environments

Authors
item Ravva, Subbarao
item Duffy, Brion
item Stanker, Larry
item Mandrell, Robert

Submitted to: UJNR Food & Agricultural Panel Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 12, 2001
Publication Date: October 15, 2001
Citation: Ravva, S.B., Duffy, B.K., Stanker, L.H., Mandrell, R.E. 2001. Foodborne Pathogens in Dairy Environments. Proceedings of the 30th United States-Japan Cooperative Program in Natural Resources (UJNR) Protein Resources Panel, October 15-19, 2001, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. p. 64-71.

Interpretive Summary: Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses caused by pathogenic bacteria have typically involved meats and processed foods. Increasingly such problems are being linked to fresh produce. One of the suspected reservoirs for pathogens that contaminate produce in the field are concentrated animal operations generating manure that can carry pathogens. This paper describes our efforts to develop improved detection methods for pathogens, particularly for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis. We also report on our efforts to understand how manure management systems affect the chemical environment on dairies. Our long-term goals are to develop integrated manure management systems that reduce pathogen numbers on dairies, thereby reducing chances for food contamination in the field.

Technical Abstract: Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses caused by pathogenic bacteria are increasingly being linked to fresh produce. Animal manure is a potential pathogen reservoir, and the close proximity of dairy operations and croplands in California cannot be ignored. We have worked on developing improved detection methods for pathogens, and on understanding how manure management systems affect the chemical environment on dairies. Our long-term goals are to develop integrated manure management systems that reduce pathogen numbers on dairies, thereby reducing chances for food contamination in the field. Data on molecular detection techniques for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, manure separation equipment, aerosol microbial transmission, and abiotic environmental analysis are presented.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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