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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nanometric Based Methodologies for Sensitive, High Throughput Detection of Viral Pathogens: Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

Authors
item Driskell, J - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Kwarta, K - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Park, H-Y - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Yakes, B - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Uhlenkamp, J - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Lipert, R - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Porter, M - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item NEILL, JOHN
item RIDPATH, JULIA

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Office International Des Epizooties World Association of
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2005
Publication Date: October 3, 2005
Citation: Driskell, J., Kwarta, K., Park, H., Yakes, B., Uhlenkamp, J., Lipert, R.J., Porter, M.D., Neill, J.D., Ridpath, J.F. 2005. Nanometric based methodologies for sensitive, high throughput detection of viral pathogens: surface enhanced raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy [abstract]. New Diagnostic Technology: Applications in Animal Health & Biologics Controls International Congress. Office International Des Epizooties World Association. p. 8.

Technical Abstract: The threat of bioterrorism has markedly amplified the demand for rapid, highly sensitive, and versatile diagnostic tests for a wide range of viral pathogens. This presentation describes efforts to develop immunoassay platforms that require minimal sample preparation and readout methodologies that facilitate the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens. Examples using monoclonal antibody arrays as platforms, and atomic force micrsocopy (AFM) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as readout methods will be presented, demonstrating the rapid, ultralow level detection of viral pathogens. AFM as a readout method allows for direct visualization and quantification of viral pathogens, while SERS readout employs nanometrically labeled antibodies as secondary labels in a sandwich immunoassay. The ability to distinguish between differing morphologies with AFM and the use of multiple SERS labels allow testing of many viruses on the same sample. These examples will set the stage for describing the underpinnings of each readout concept as well as details related to procedures for designing, constructing, and applying these chip-scale platforms. Each example will also discuss challenges related to sensitivity and nonspecific adsorption and to fluid manipulation at micrometer length scales.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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