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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Diagnosis of Mycoplasma Gallisepticum from a Broiler Breeder Flock: Comparison of Three Diagnostic Methods

Authors
item Evans, Jeff
item Thornton, D - MS BOARD OF ANIMAL HEALTH
item Branton, Scott

Submitted to: International Journal of Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 10, 2009
Publication Date: February 22, 2009
Citation: Evans, J.D., Thornton, D., Branton, S.L. 2009. Diagnosis of mycoplasma gallisepticum from a broiler breeder flock: comparison of three diagnostic methods. International Journal of Poultry Science 8(2):104-107.

Interpretive Summary: Biosurveillance remains an important means to control major and economically significant avian diseases such as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG)-induced mycoplasmosis. In accordance with the voluntary avian surveillance program, the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP), a multiplier broiler breeder flock was tested for exposure to MG. Initial findings indicated possible MG exposure. Thereby, the flock was quarantined and further samples were collected and sent to an independent facility (Poultry Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Mississippi State, MS) for confirmatory diagnostics. This report documents the tests performed and their results. Tests administered included diagnosis by serum plate agglutination (SPA), MG-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and culture identification. Results of all tests performed by the Poultry Research Unit were in agreement and confirmed infection of the breeder flock by MG. Due to the importance of a timely diagnosis, time requirements for each diagnostic procedure were also evaluated and were determined to be 1 hr, 27 hr, and 30 days for SPA, MG-specific PCR, and culture identification, respectively.

Technical Abstract: NPIP-mandated serological screening of a multiplier breeder flock detected possible Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) exposure. The flock was quarantined and further samples including blood and choanal swabs were collected and sent to a research facility for independent testing and confirmation. Subsequent analyses included diagnosis by serum plate agglutination (SPA), MG-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and culture identification. Results of the various diagnostic tests were compared. The findings of the various diagnostic tests were in agreement and confirmed MG infection of the breeder flock. Time requirements of the various diagnostic procedures were recorded and were 1 hr, 27 hr, and 30 days for SPA, MG-specific PCR, and culture identification, respectively. The results affirm the validity of the diagnostic procedures and emphasize the importance of timely screening and diagnostic procedures for control of MG.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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