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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Distribution of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Genes among Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated from Poultry and Humans

Authors
item Hazariwala, A - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Sanders, Q - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Jackson, Charlene
item Hofacre, C - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Thayer, S - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Maurer, J - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

Submitted to: American Society for Microbiology Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 20, 2001
Publication Date: May 20, 2001
Citation: Hazariwala, A., Sanders, Q., Jackson, C.R., Hofacre, C., Thayer, S.G., Maurer, J.J. 2001. Distribution of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes among staphylococcus aureus isolated from poultry and humans. American Society for Microbiology Meeting. Session 79/Z. Abstract. Z-10. P. 740.

Technical Abstract: Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of illnesses in both humans and domestic animals. For S. aureus to cause food-borne illness, it must have one of five enterotoxin genes. The staphylococcal enterotoxins are responsible for the symptoms associated with staphylococcal food poisoning. The enterotoxin genes however are not uniformly distributed among S. aureus. If S. aureus were included under HACCP, would its isolation be a significant indicator of a biological adulterant in foods? By PCR, we examined the distribution of staphylococcal enterotoxins among S. aureus isolated from chickens and humans in northeast Georgia. Enterotoxin A, the staphylococcal toxin most commonly encountered with cases of staphylococcal food poisoning, was present in 7% of poultry and human staphylococci. Additional enterotoxins, B and C were also detected in S. aureus isolated from both groups. Isolation of S. aureus from poultry alone is not a significant finding unless they are tested for staphylococcal enterotoxins A-D.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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