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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: VACCINOLOGY AND IMMUNITY OF AQUATIC ANIMALS

Location: Aquatic Animal Health Research

Title: Attenuated Vaccines for Edwardsiella Ictaluri and Flavobacterium Columnare of Catfish

Authors
item Klesius, Phillip
item Shoemaker, Craig
item Evans, Joyce

Submitted to: Research Workers in Animal Diseases Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 5, 2005
Publication Date: December 4, 2005
Citation: Klesius, P.H., Shoemaker, C.A., Evans, J.J. Attenuated vaccines for Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare of catfish. 2005. Research Workers in Animal Diseases Conference Proceedings, Special Session. St. Louis, MO.

Technical Abstract: Prevention of fish diseases is becoming more dependent on the use of vaccines. An important consideration is what type of vaccine to use: attenuated or a killed vaccine? The choice of the vaccine needs to be compatible with production system and growth cycle of the fish species. Also, the choice needs to be compatible with method of administration and the duration of protection. The best type of vaccine is one that is cost-effectively administered to large numbers of the youngest life-stage of fish with no or minimal stress. Attenuated vaccines fulfill these needs for the catfish industry. Attenuated vaccines against Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare (LPS modified mutants) are licensed for use in 7-10 day post-hatched catfish fry by immersion exposure for 2 minutes. The USDA, Agricultural Research Service vaccines were licensed to Intervet and marketed under the trade name AQUAVAC-ESC and AQUAVAC-COL for protection against enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) and columnaris (COL). Vaccinated fish (200 million vaccinates) had higher survival rates (75-90%) against ESC and COL. Intervet estimated that economic benefit to the producer is $1,706 per acre over non-vaccinated catfish. The vaccinates eat more and grow faster than non-vaccinates.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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