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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Whey Protein Decreases Body Weight and Fat in Supplemented Overweight and Obese Adults

Authors
item Baer, David
item Stote, Kim
item Clevidence, Beverly
item Harris, Gabriel
item Paul, David - JOHNS HOPKINS
item Rumpler, William

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2006
Publication Date: April 1, 2006
Citation: Baer, D.J., Stote, K.S., Clevidence, B.A., Harris, G.K., Paul, D., Rumpler, W.V. 2006. Whey protein decreases body weight and fat in supplemented overweight and obese adults. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference, April 2006, San Francisco, CA. FASEB J 20:A427.

Technical Abstract: A double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effects of supplemental whey protein, compared to soy protein and an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate, on body weight and composition in free-living, overweight and obese (BMI > 28 and < 38) but otherwise healthy individuals. Ninety individuals were randomized for 6 mo to one of three treatment groups: 1) 60 g/d of whey protein, 2) 60 g/d of soy protein or 3) a control group receiving 60 g/d of carbohydrate. Each week, subjects were weighed. Body composition was measured weekly by BIA, monthly by BodPod, and at the beginning and end of the intervention, by DEXA. After 6 mo, body weight of the group consuming the whey protein was 1.8 ± 0.6 kg (2%) lower than the group consuming the carbohydrate treatment (P<0.006). Body weight was not different between the groups consuming the soy protein and whey protein (P>0.10) or between the groups consuming the soy protein and carbohydrate treatment (P>0.10). After 6 mo, body fat (from BodPod) was 2.3 ± 0.8 kg lower in the group consuming the whey protein compared to the group consuming the carbohydrate treatment (P<0.005). Lean body mass was not different among groups. There was no significant effect of treatment on body composition measured by bioelectrical impedance or by DEXA. Waist circumference was lower (P<0.0001) in the group consuming the whey protein than the two other groups. Thus, compared to added calories from carbohydrate, added calories from whey protein can decrease body weight. The change in body weight is associated with a decrease in body fat without affecting lean body mass. Supported by the USDA and Whey Protein Research Consortium.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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