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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: SUMMIT RUSSET: A NEW RUSSET POTATO VARIETY WITH GOOD FRESH MARKET AND FROZEN PROCESSING QUALITIES

Authors
item Love, S. - UNIV OF ID, ABERDEEN, ID
item Novy, Richard
item Whitworth, Jonathan
item Corsini, Dennis - USDA/ARS RETIRED ABERDEEN
item Pavek, J. - USDA/ARE RETIRED ABERDEEN
item Mosley, A. - OR STATE UNIV, CORVALLIS
item Thornton, R. - WA STATE UNIV, PULLMAN
item Knowles, N. - WA STATE UNIV, PULLMAN
item James, S. - OR STATE UNIV, MADRAS, OR
item Hane, D. - OR STATE UNIV, HERMISTON

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 17, 2005
Publication Date: November 1, 2005
Citation: Love, S.L., Novy, R.G., Whitworth, J.L., Corsini, D.L., Pavek, J.J., Mosley, A.R., Thornton, R.E., Knowles, N.R., James, S.R., Hane, D.C. 2005. Summit russet: a new russet potato variety with good fresh market and frozen processing qualities. American Journal of Potato Research. 82(6):425-432.

Interpretive Summary: Summit Russet (A84118-3), the result of the cross A77236-6 x TND329-1Russ, was released in 2003 by the USDA/ARS and the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The vines of Summit Russet are erect, with very thick stems, large yellowish-green leaves and abundant white flowers. The tubers are tan, with medium russet skin, long-flattened shape, a slightly prominent eyebrow, white flesh, and moderately prominent pith. Tuber dormancy is very long. Summit Russet was compared with Russet Burbank in trials across the Pacific Northwest for yield, quality, and disease response. In general, Summit Russet produced similar or lower total yields than did Russet Burbank, but higher U.S. No. 1 yields. In Idaho variety trials, Summit Russet exhibited resistance to second growth, growth cracks, blackspot bruise, and stem-end discoloration, and moderate susceptibility to hollow heart and shatter bruise. In comprehensive product quality evaluations, Summit Russet was rated superior to Russet Burbank for french fry quality and similar for baked potato quality. French fry quality was retained after long-term storage. In replicated disease trials, Summit Russet was found to have good resistance to common scab, early blight tuber rot, and verticillium wilt, and moderate resistance to Fusarium dry rot and tuber net necrosis caused by PLRV. It demonstrated susceptibility to late blight, foliar PLRV, PVX, PVYo, and bacterial soft rot. Biochemical analysis of Summit Russet tubers showed them to be higher in total solids and sucrose, and lower in dextrose than those of Russet Burbank.

Technical Abstract: Summit Russet (A84118-3), the result of the cross A77236-6 x TND329-1Russ, was released in 2003 by the USDA/ARS and the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The vines of Summit Russet are erect, with very thick stems, large yellowish-green leaves and abundant white flowers. The tubers are tan, with medium russet skin, long-flattened shape, a slightly prominent eyebrow, white flesh, and moderately prominent pith. Tuber dormancy is very long. Summit Russet was compared with Russet Burbank in trials across the Pacific Northwest for yield, quality, and disease response. In general, Summit Russet produced similar or lower total yields than did Russet Burbank, but higher U.S. No. 1 yields. In Idaho variety trials, Summit Russet exhibited resistance to second growth, growth cracks, blackspot bruise, and stem-end discoloration, and moderate susceptibility to hollow heart and shatter bruise. In comprehensive product quality evaluations, Summit Russet was rated superior to Russet Burbank for french fry quality and similar for baked potato quality. French fry quality was retained after long-term storage. In replicated disease trials, Summit Russet was found to have good resistance to common scab, early blight tuber rot, and verticillium wilt, and moderate resistance to Fusarium dry rot and tuber net necrosis caused by PLRV. It demonstrated susceptibility to late blight, foliar PLRV, PVX, PVYo, and bacterial soft rot. Biochemical analysis of Summit Russet tubers showed them to be higher in total solids and sucrose, and lower in dextrose than those of Russet Burbank.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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