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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF INVASIVE AQUATIC AND RIPARIAN WEEDS Title: Estuarine Wetlands (Chapter: Terrestrial Vegetation of California)

Authors
item Grewell, Brenda
item Callaway, John - UNIV. OF SAN FRANCISCO
item Ferren, Wayne - MASER CONSULTING

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 10, 2006
Publication Date: July 7, 2007
Citation: Grewell, B.J., Callaway, J.C., Ferren, W.R. 2007. Estuarine wetlands. In: Barbour, M.G., Keeler-Wolf, T., Schoenherr, A. A., editors. Terrestrial Vegetation of California. 3rd edition. Berkeley, California: University of California Press. p.124-154.

Interpretive Summary: This book chapter on estuarine wetlands is a peer-reviewed contribution to the 3rd edition of Terrestrial Vegetation of California. The past two editions became classic, definitive references to the vegetation of California. The book is written by professional ecologists for other professionals in natural resource agencies, education, consulting, and conservation-oriented NGOs, as well as for advanced university students. Research of the past 25 years is thoroughly integrated into the chapter. The topics covered include an introduction to estuarine vegetation, factors influencing marsh community composition and structure, and a regional biogeography of the flora. The chapter provides a new focus on management and conservation issues including exotic plant invasions and restoration research, and provides a summary of future research needs.

Technical Abstract: This chapter on estuarine wetlands is a peer-reviewed contribution to the 3rd edition of Terrestrial Vegetation of California (editors: M.G. Barbour, T. Keeler-Wolf, and A. Schoenherr, University of California Press). The objective of the chapter is to describe the distribution, floristic composition, and ecology of estuarine plants along the California coast. Research of the past 25 years has been thoroughly reviewed and integrated into the chapter. Topics covered include marsh formation and dynamics, marsh plant adaptations to anoxia and salinity stress, abiotic and biotic influences on plant community composition and structure, autecology of characteristic taxa, and a regional biogeography of the flora. The chapter provides a new focus on conservation and restoration successes and challenges. Of particular note are contributions in salt marsh restoration ecology, and an increasing awareness of the extent and ecological impact of exotic plant invasions. The chapter closes with a summary of future research needs.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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