Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Preliminary Examination of the Impact on Fiber Quality of Moisture Restoration of Low Moisture Seed Cotton

Authors
item BYLER, RICHARD
item Boykin Jr, James

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 4, 2006
Publication Date: June 10, 2006
Citation: Byler, R.K., Boykin Jr, J.C. 2006. Preliminary examination of the impact on fiber quality of moisture restoration of low moisture seed cotton. National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference. CD ROM pp. 567-584.

Interpretive Summary: Ginning and lint cleaning processes involve considerable forces and individual fibers are broken during these processes. The broken fibers result in lint of lower value which produces yarn of lower strength and value. Previous research has shown that ginning cotton at lower moisture content results in more broken fiber. Drier seed cotton is easier to clean so ginners tend to dry the cotton more than desirable plus the weather often results in seed cotton drier than optimum for ginning. Few gins add moisture to seed cotton before ginning. This research looked at two methods of adding moisture to seed cotton before ginning. The method of adding moisture did not affect the results but the fiber length was improved and the amount of short fiber in the ginned lint decreased after ginning at higher moisture. The method of spraying a mist of water on the seed cotton before it entered the gin stand resulted in statistically significant improvement of fiber length properties. The spray method appears to be an effective and reasonable way to add small amounts of moisture to seed cotton which will result in better fiber length properties in the ginned lint which will result in a more desirable product. Cotton gins that ensure that adequate moisture is in the fiber before fiber-seed separation will produce cotton that will be more competitive in international markets.

Technical Abstract: Sixty bales of cotton were ginned with three drying levels, two humidified air application levels, and three levels of water applied with spray before the gin stand. The treatments significantly affected the lint moisture content (mc) of samples taken between the gin stand and the lint cleaner and also of lint samples taken at the lint flue. The lint mc variation from 4.0 to 5.7% significantly affected the AFIS fiber length properties with better properties resulting when higher mc fiber was ginned. These effects were independent of the method of arriving at the lint mc. The cotton classing properties of staple, HVI length and HVI length uniformity were improved when ginning at higher mc while the leaf and the Rd portion of HVI color were degraded slightly. The spray method appears to be an effective and reasonable way to add small amounts of moisture to seed cotton which will result in better fiber length properties in the ginned lint.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page