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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: FECAL PREVALENCE OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157, SALMONELLA, LISTERIA, AND BACTERIOPHAGE INFECTING E. COLI O157:H7 IN FEEDLOT CATTLE IN THE SOUTHERN PLAINS REGION OF THE UNITED STATES.

Authors
item Callaway, Todd
item Edrington, Thomas
item Keen, James
item Anderson, Robin
item Genovese, Kenneth
item Poole, Toni
item Harvey, Roger
item Nisbet, David
item Brabban, A - EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE
item Rossman, M - NCBA

Submitted to: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 20, 2006
Publication Date: September 1, 2006
Citation: Callaway, T.R., Edrington, T.S., Brabban, A.D., Keen, J.E., Anderson, R.C., Rossman, M.L., Engler, M.J., Genovese, K.J., Gwartney, B.L., Reagan, J.O., Poole, T.L., Harvey, R.B., Kutter, E.M., Nisbet, D.J. 2006. Fecal prevalence of Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella, Listeria, and bacteriophage infecting E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot cattle in the southern plains region of the United States. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. 3:234-244.

Interpretive Summary: Bacteriophage are bacterial viruses that kill bacteria and are specifically active against certain species or even strains. The food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli O157:H7 lives in the intestinal tract of cattle, as do bacteriophage that target E. coli O157:H7. However, the incidence of these E. coli O157:H7 targeting phage in commercial cattle is unknown. In the present study we isolated Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 from 3.8% and 11.7%, respectively, of the 240 fecal samples from commercial feedlot cattle in the central U.S. Phage targeting E. coli O157:H7 were also found in all four feedlots. Our results indicate that such phages are widespread in feedlot cattle, suggesting that further research into the ecological role of bacteriophage in the gastrointestinal tract is needed.

Technical Abstract: Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria are food-borne pathogens that often colonize cattle. E. coli O157:H7 can be specifically killed by bacteriophage (bacteriophage), and bacteriophage treatment has been suggested as a pre-harvest intervention strategy to reduce food-borne pathogens in cattle. To date no systematic approach to determine the incidence of E. coli O157:H7-infecting bacteriophage has been published. Therefore the current study was designed to determine the incidence of E. coli O157, Salmonella spp., and Listeria as well as the incidence of E. coli O157:H7-infecting bacteriophage in the feces of feedlot steers in commercial feedlots in the United States. Fecal samples (n = 60) were collected from four feedlots in two Southern Great Plains states (total n = 240 fecal samples). Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 were found in 3.8% and 11.7% of the fecal samples, respectively. Phage targeting E. coli O157:H7 were found in all four feedlots in 15% of the individual fecal samples, and in 55% of the cattle pens. Our results indicate that such phages are widespread in feedlot cattle, suggesting that further research into the ecological role of bacteriophage in the gastrointestinal tract is needed.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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