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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF MOTHS, LEAFHOPPERS, AND TRUE BUGS OF IMPORTANCE TO AGRICULTURAL, FOREST, AND ORNAMENTAL PLANTS Title: Synopsis of the eastern North American species of the plant bug Genus Parthenicus, with descriptions of three new species, a lectotype designation, new records, and a revised key (Heteroptera: Miridae: Orthotylinae)

Author
item Henry, Thomas

Submitted to: American Museum Novitates
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 13, 2006
Publication Date: December 12, 2007
Citation: Henry, T.J. 2007. Synopsis of the eastern North American species of the plant bug Genus Parthenicus, with descriptions of three new species, a lectotype designation, new records, and a revised key (Heteroptera: Miridae: Orthotylinae). American Museum Novitates. 3593:1-30.

Interpretive Summary: Plant bugs represent the largest and most economically important family of true bugs. Many, such as lygus bugs and the cotton fleahopper, are important pests causing millions of dollars in losses annually to agricultural crops. The plant bugs treated in this paper belong to a larger group containing more than 80 species of plant-feeding species that occur on a wide array of grasses and flowering plants. This paper reviews the 10 species that occur in eastern United States and Canada, provides descriptions of three species new to science, and gives illustrations, hosts, and distributions for each, and an identification key to help in their recognition. This information will be valuable to all researchers and agricultural specialists involved in the biological control and identification of crop and ornamental insect pests.

Technical Abstract: Abstract.–Three new species of the orthotyline genus Parthenicus Reuter are described and the seven previously known species of eastern North America are diagnosed. Parthenicus cruentus, n. sp., is described from Nebraska; P. sedumicola, n. sp., from Arkansas, and P. wheeleri, n. sp., from Oklahoma and Texas. A lectotype from Texas is designated and male genitalia are illustrated for P. psalliodes Reuter, the type species of the genus. Also provided are selected scanning electron photomicrographs and illustrations of the male genitalia for new species, a color habitus illustration for P. sedumicola, and for all species a color dorsal habitus photograph, hosts, and distribution information. A revised identification key to the 10 eastern species is given to help distinguish species.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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