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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Spoilage Microflora of Broiler Carcasses Washed with Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water Or Chlorinated Water Using An Inside-Outside Bird Washer

Authors
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur
item Northcutt, Julie
item Smith, Douglas
item Musgrove, Michael
item Ingram, Kimberly

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 13, 2006
Publication Date: December 20, 2006
Citation: Hinton Jr, A., Northcutt, J.K., Smith, D.P., Musgrove, M.T., Ingram, K.D. 2006. Spoilage microflora of broiler carcasses washed with electrolyzed oxidizing water or chlorinated water using an inside-outside bird washer. Poultry Science. 86:123-127.

Interpretive Summary: The effect of electrolyzed water and chlorinated water on the number and type of spoilage microorganisms found on chicken carcasses was examined. Carcasses were obtained from a local commercial processing facility and sprayed with tap water, chlorinated water, or electrolyzed water in a bird washing device. The numbers and types of microorganisms on the carcasses were determined before and during storage in a refrigerator for up to 14 days. Results indicated that immediately after spraying the carcasses, there were generally fewer bacteria and yeasts recovered from carcasses sprayed with electrolyzed water than from carcasses sprayed with chlorinated water or tap water. The number of bacteria and yeasts increased on all carcasses during refrigerated storage, but after 14 days of storage fewer microorganisms were recovered from carcasses sprayed with electrolyzed water than from carcasses sprayed with tap water or chlorinated water. The types of bacteria isolated from carcasses refrigerated for different periods of time changed during refrigeration. Experiments indicated that electrolyzed water can effectively be used to decrease the population spoilage bacteria and yeasts on processed broiler carcasses.

Technical Abstract: The effect of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water and chlorinated water on the spoilage microflora of broiler carcasses was examined. Carcasses were sprayed with tap water, chlorinated water, or EO water in an inside-outside bird washer (IOBW)then stored at 4C for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days. The microbial flora of the carcasses was sampled, and populations of psychrotrophic bacteria and yeasts in the in the microflora were enumerated. Results indicated that immediately after spraying the carcasses, significantly fewer pseudomonads, psychrotrophs, and yeasts were recovered from carcasses sprayed with chlorinated water or EO water than with tap water and significantly fewer pseudomonads were recovered from carcasses sprayed with EO water than from carcasses sprayed with chlorinated water. The population of psychrotrophs and yeasts increased on all carcasses during refrigerated storage, but after 14 days of storage significantly fewer microorganisms were recovered from carcasses sprayed with EO water than from carcasses sprayed with tap water or chlorinated water. Enteric bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. were the primary microorganisms isolated from rinsates of fresh carcasses, while Pseudomonas spp. and Candida spp. were the primary isolates from carcasses stored at 4C for 14 days. Findings from the present study indicate that EO water can effectively be used in IOBWs to decrease the population spoilage bacteria and yeasts on processed broiler carcasses.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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