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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATION OF NUTRITIONAL, GENETIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY OF RAINBOW TROUT

Location: Small Grains and Potato Germplasm Research

Title: Alterations in Expression of Genes Associated with Muscle Metabolism and Growth During Nutritional Restriction and Refeeding in Rainbow Trout

Authors
item Johansen, Katherine
item Overturf, Kenneth

Submitted to: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 4, 2006
Publication Date: February 28, 2006
Citation: Overturf, K.E., and Johansen, K.A. 2006 Alterations in expression of genes associated with muscle metabolism and growth during nutritional restriction and refeeding in rainbow trout. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. 144:119-127.

Interpretive Summary: Alterations in expression of genes associated with muscle metabolism and growth during nutritional restriction and refeeding in rainbow trout Rainbow trout, as well as many other species of fish, demonstrate the ability to survive starvation for long periods of time. During starvation, growth rate is decreased and muscle exhibits signs of wasting. However, upon resumption of feeding, accelerated growth is often observed. Alterations in muscle metabolism occur during feed restriction and refeeding, although the ways in which these alterations affect the molecular pathways that control muscle growth have not been fully determined. To analyze changes in muscle metabolism and growth during starvation and refeeding, changes in expression of genes required for specific aspects of metabolism and muscle growth were examined after 30 days of starvation, and after four and 14 days of refeeding. The expression levels of many of the metabolic-related genes were altered during the refeeding period compared to those observed before the starvation period began. However, the accelerated growth often observed during refeeding is likely driven by changes in normal muscle metabolism, and the altered expression observed here may be a demonstration of those changes.

Technical Abstract: Alterations in expression of genes associated with muscle metabolism and growth during nutritional restriction and refeeding in rainbow trout Rainbow trout, as well as many other species of fish, demonstrate the ability to survive starvation for long periods of time. During starvation, growth rate is decreased and muscle exhibits signs of wasting. However, upon resumption of feeding, accelerated growth is often observed. Alterations in muscle metabolism occur during feed restriction and refeeding, although the ways in which these alterations affect the molecular pathways that control muscle growth have not been fully determined. To analyze changes in muscle metabolism and growth during starvation and refeeding, real-time PCR was used to test the expression of six metabolic-related genes and eight muscle-specific genes in rainbow trout white muscle prior to and after 30 days of starvation, and after four and 14 days of refeeding. The six metabolic-related genes chosen are indicative of specific metabolic pathways: glycolysis, glycogenesis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and fatty acid formation. The eight muscle specific genes chosen are key components in muscle growth and structural integrity, i. e., MRFs, MEFs, myostatins, and myosin. Alterations in expression of the tested metabolic-related genes and muscle-specific genes suggest that during both starvation and refeeding, changes in specific metabolic pathways initiate shifts in muscle that result mainly in the modification of myotube hypertrophy. The expression levels of many of the metabolic-related genes were altered during the refeeding period compared to those observed before the starvation period began. However, the accelerated growth often observed during refeeding is likely driven by changes in normal muscle metabolism, and the altered expression observed here may be a demonstration of those changes.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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