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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Initial Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins from Mycoplasma Gallisepticum Vaccine Strains Ts-11 and F Detected by Western Blotting

Authors
item Collier, Stephanie
item Pharr, G - MISS STATE UNIVERSITY
item Branton, Scott
item Evans, Jeff
item Leigh, Spencer
item Felfoldi, B - MISS STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: International Journal of Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2006
Publication Date: July 20, 2006
Citation: Collier, S. D., Pharr, G. T., Branton, S. L., Evans, J. D., Leigh, S. A., and Felfoldi, B. 2006. Initial Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins from Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccine Strains ts-11 and F Detected by Western Blotting. Int. J. of Poultry Sci. 5(4): 330-336.

Interpretive Summary: Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) causes chronic respiratory disease in layer chickens. There are currently 3 live MG vaccines approved for use in the United States and they include F-strain, ts-11 and 6/85. The MG vaccine strains ts-11 and 6/85 are safer than F- strain and they have little or no potential of spreading from bird to bird. However, ts-11 and 6/85 appear to be less efficacious than F-strain. Control practices against MG infections have included the use of F-strain in displacement and revaccination regimens and as a result have necessitated the development of more rapid and sensitive field tests that will differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains of MG. In the present study, Western blotting and proteomic methodologies were used to identify and characterize MG proteins that could contribute to the development and improvement of current MG diagnostic tests.

Technical Abstract: Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) reduces the number of eggs produced by layer chickens. Three live MG vaccine strains are available for use in layer chickens and include F, ts-11 and 6/85. The MG vaccine strains ts-11 and 6/85 are safer than F and they have little or no potential of spreading from bird to bird. However, ts-11 and 6/85 appear to be less efficacious than F-strain. Results from studies suggest that the use of MG vaccine strain F in replacement flocks over a period of time results in the displacement of the original field strain. Also, reports of MG breaks in layer flocks previously vaccinated with ts-11 or 6/85 have resulted in revaccination of these flocks with F. The continued use of F-strain in displacement and revaccination regimens necessitates the development of more rapid and sensitive field tests that will differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains of MG. In the present study, ts-11 and F-strain whole cell extracts were analyzed by proteomic methodologies. The results of this study suggest that proteomics may aid in the characterization of proteins that could contribute to the development and improvement of current MG diagnostic tests.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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