Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Interference and Seed-Rain Dynamics of Jimsonweed (Datura Stramonium L.) in Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea L.)

Authors
item Price, Andrew
item Barker, W - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV
item Burke, I - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV
item Thomas, W - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV
item Wilcut, J - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Peanut Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 15, 2006
Publication Date: July 1, 2006
Citation: Price, A.J., Barker, W., Burke, I.C., Thomas, W.E., Wilcut, J.W. 2006. Interference and seed-rain dynamics of jimsonweed (datura stramonium l.) in peanut (arachis hypogaea l.). Peanut Science. 33:142-146.

Interpretive Summary: Jimsonweed has been shown to be a problematic weed in North Carolina and Virginia; however, its effects on peanut have not been evaluated. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine peanut yield and growth reductions caused by jimsonweed interference. Experiments were conducted in 2004 in North Carolina. With the exception of jimsonweed, the experimental area was kept weed-free utilizing herbicides and hand hoeing. Jimsonweed seedlings were transplanted into plots immediately after peanut planting at different densities. Results indicated that peanut yield and growth is impacted negatively as jimsonweed density increases. Additionally, jimsonweed plant and seed pod weights decreased as jimsonweed density increased.

Technical Abstract: Jimsonweed has been shown to be a problematic weed in North Carolina and Virginia; however, its effects of interference in peanut have not been evaluated. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine peanut yield and growth reductions caused by jimsonweed interference. Experiments were conducted in 2004 at the Upper Coastal Plain Research Station located near Rocky Mount, North Carolina and the Cherry Research Farm near Goldsboro, North Carolina. With the exception of jimsonweed, the experimental area was kept weed-free utilizing herbicides and hand hoeing. Jimsonweed seedlings at the cotyledon to 2-leaf stage were transplanted into plots immediately after peanut planting at the following densities: 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 plants per 6 m of row. Peanut diameter, measured as canopy row width at four random locations, increased over time regardless of jimsonweed density, thus, peanut diameter does not appear to be a viable predictor of peanut productivity or jimsonweed competition. Jimsonweed plant and seed pod weights decreased logarithmically as jimsonweed density increased. When jimsonweed was grown at lower densities, seed production amounted to nearly 30,000 per plant, which was reduced to 10,000 per plant when densities increased to 32 plants per 6 m of row. However, overall seed production increased slightly at the highest density over the lowest density 32,000 compared to 30,000, respectively. Peanut height increased from 44 to 57 cm as jimsonweed density increased from 0 to 5.25 plants/m of row. Similarly, jimsonweed heights increased from 97 to 139 cm as jimsonweed density increased from 0 to 5.25 plants/m of row. A rectangular hyperbola equation described the effect of density on percent yield loss with i and a values of 10.7 and 98, respectively.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page