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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH FOR IMPROVING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND PRODUCER PROFITABILITY Title: Cotton Systems Research: Evaluating Herbicide Technologies, Tillage Systems, and Row Spacings

Authors
item Balkcom, Kipling
item Price, Andrew
item Arriaga, Francisco
item Delaney, D - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Agricultural Experiment Station Publication
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2006
Publication Date: May 1, 2006
Citation: Balkcom, K.S., Price, A.J., Arriaga, F.J., Delaney, D.P. 2006. Cotton systems research: evaluating herbicide technologies, tillage systems, and row spacings. In: Lawrence, K. s., Monks, C.D., Delaney, D. P., editors. 2006 Cotton Research Report, Alabama Agricultral Experiment, Research Report No. 28.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two tillage systems, tow row spacings, and three cotton varieties on yield, fiber quality, soil moisture, weed management, and economic returns. Cotton varieties, tillage systems, and row spacings were implemented at the Field Crops Unit of the E.V. Smith Research and Extension Center near Shorter, AL. Treatments arranged in a split-split-plot design with four replications. Cotton varieties were conventional cotton, RoundUp Ready, and Liberty Link. Tillage systems included either conventional tillage or no-tillage (both with fall paratill). Row spacings were 40 or 15 inches. Row spacing affected all the measured variables with the 15-inch cotton superior to 40-inch cotton. Small differences among cotton varieties were observed for outturn and lint with the conventional and Roundup-Ready varieties superior to the Liberty-Link variety. The no-tillage system resulted in more plants ac-1 and higher plant biomass measured at squaring, regardless of variety or row spacing. These preliminary results indicate that 15-inch cotton can improve cotton productivity, but the economics associated with seeding costs and equipment modifications have not been examined.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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