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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic, Physical, Maps, and Database Resources for Maize

Authors
item Coe, Jr, Edward - USDA-ARS RETIRED
item Schaeffer, Mary

Submitted to: Maydica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 2, 2005
Publication Date: September 1, 2005
Repository URL: http://www.cerealicoltura.it/EDITORIA/maidica/CONTENTS05.htm
Citation: Coe, Jr, E.H., Schaeffer, M.L. 2005. Genetic, Physical, Maps, and Database Resources for Maize. Maydica. 50:285-303.

Interpretive Summary: Resources for maize genetics and genomics exist in great depth and breadth. Genetic materials available include the trait variations in tens of thousands of diverse germplasm collections, and a readily accessible, 75-year collection of mutant variations. Descriptions of germplasms as well as of mutant variations are available online. Maps of genes in diagrammatic and in tabulated form, accompanied by linked supportive data, have been updated recently. High-resolution genetic maps with molecular markers undergird the physical mapping, anchoring and orienting sequence-ready clones to the chromosomes. Physical mapping has progressed to the point that the gene space is largely encompassed, and sequencing of the genome is ready to proceed. All of these resources can be brought to bear on maize productivity, on selected properties, and on studies of genetic functions, mechanisms of inheritance, phylogeny, and processes of change during domestication. Enhanced maize productivity and quality is important to the US, and the world, including farmers, producers, consumers and manufacturers of goods based on corn products.

Technical Abstract: Resources for maize genetics and genomics exist in great depth and breadth. They can be brought to bear on its productivity, on selected properties, and on studies of genetic functions, mechanisms of inheritance, phylogeny, and processes of change during domestication. Genetic materials available include the trait variations in tens of thousands of diverse germplasm collections, and a readily accessible, 75-year collection of mutant variations. Descriptions of germplasms as well as of mutant variations are available online. Maps of genes in diagrammatic and in tabulated form, accompanied by linked supportive data, have been updated recently. High-resolution genetic maps with molecular markers undergird physical mapping, anchoring and orienting contigs to the chromosomes. Physical mapping has progressed to the point that minimum tiling paths can be defined for the genome, the gene space is largely encompassed, and sequencing of the genome is ready to proceed.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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