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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Control Measures for Brucellosis in the United States

Author
item OLSEN, STEVEN

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 27, 2006
Publication Date: September 27, 2006
Citation: Olsen, S.C. 2006. Control Measures for Brucellosis in the United States. In: Proceedings of the Korean Society of Veterinary Science, September 27-28, 2006, Tonyoung City, Korea. p. 43-44.

Interpretive Summary: Brucellosis, a disease characterized by abortion and fetal losses, remains endemic in domestic livestock in many areas worldwide. Infection of livestock with B. abortus, B. melitensis, or B. suis pose a significant health risk for transmission to humans by direct contact or from consumption of unpasturized milk products. Infection of humans with Brucella causes a wide range of clinical symptoms including the classical syndrome of Aundulant fever@. In the United States, the brucellosis eradication program is based on trained personnel and laboratories, market surveillance, epidemiologic traceback from infected herds, calfhood vaccination, sanitation, and strict management/quarantine of known infected herds. The success of the brucellosis eradication programs in the United States is further documentation that well managed programs can reduce the prevalence of disease in livestock reservoirs and enhance public health by preventing zoonotic infections associated with exposure to infected livestock.

Technical Abstract: Brucellosis in domestic livestock remains a significant human health threat in many areas of the world. The brucellosis eradication program in the United States is based on trained personnel and laboratories, market surveillance, epidemiologic traceback from infected herds, calfhood vaccination, sanitation, and strict management/quarantine of known infected herds. States are classified based on prevalence of brucellosis within the state to provide financial incentives to reduce prevalence, and to assist other states in preventing reentry of brucellosis into their state. Trained epidemiologists developed herd plans after identification of Brucella-infected herds, however, due to the low incidence of brucellosis in the United States depopulation is currently the preferred alternative. The success of the brucellosis eradication programs in the United States is further documentation that well managed programs can reduce the prevalence of disease in livestock reservoirs and enhance public health by preventing zoonotic infections associated with exposure to infected livestock.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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