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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Wasting and neurologic signs associated with cerebrovascular mineralization in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileu virginianus)

Authors
item Hamir, Amirali
item PALMER, MITCHELL
item Kunkle, Robert

Submitted to: Journal of Wildlife Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 4, 2008
Publication Date: October 1, 2008
Citation: Hamir, A.N., Palmer, M.V., Kunkle, R.A. 2008. Wasting and Neurologic Signs in a White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Not Associated with Abnormal Prion Protein. Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 44(4):1045-1050.

Interpretive Summary: A case resembling chronic wasting disease (CWD) in a white-tailed deer was examined. Some of the clinical and laboratory features of this case were similar to CWD of white-tailed deer. However, the deer's tissues were negative for CWD by a laboratory test. Since some of the brain lesions in this deer were similar to that seen in CWD, it is speculated that this would have resulted in similar clinical signs to that seen in white-tailed deer with CWD. To our knowledge such a case has not been described previously. Laboratories involved in diagnosis of CWD should be aware of this syndrome and should consider such a case in differential diagnosis of CWD of white-tailed deer.

Technical Abstract: A case of wasting and neurologic syndrome (WANS) of white-tailed deer was evaluated by histopathology, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for disease associated prion protein (PrP**d). Some of the clinical and pathological features of this case were similar to chronic wasting disease (CWD) of white-tailed deer. Histo-morphologically, the brain showed areas of vacuolation in neuropil and extensive multifocal mineralization of blood vessels with occasional occlusion of the lumen. However, the tissues were negative for PrP**d by IHC. Since the lesions were more prominent in the obex region of the brainstem, it is speculated that this would have resulted in similar clinical signs to that seen in white-tailed deer with CWD. To our knowledge WANS and mineralization of blood vessels in the brain of white-tailed deer has not been described previously. Diagnosticians should be aware of this syndrome and WANS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of CWD of white-tailed deer.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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