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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES, FUMONISINS AND FUSARIUM DISEASES OF MAIZE Title: Molecular biology of Fusarium mycotoxins

Authors
item Desjardins, Anne
item Proctor, Robert

Submitted to: International Journal of Food Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 22, 2007
Publication Date: November 7, 2007
Citation: Desjardins, A.E., Proctor, R. 2007. Molecular biology of Fusarium mycotoxins. International Journal of Food Microbiology. 119(1-2):47-50.

Interpretive Summary: This review summarizes recent research on the molecular biology of several types of mycotoxins produced by plant pathogenic species of the fungus Fusarium. This review will facilitate the identification of aspects of mycotoxin biosynthesis and regulation that can be exploited for mycotoxin control. This information will further the development of targeted approaches for breeding and engineering crops for resistance to Fusarium infection and mycotoxin contamination.

Technical Abstract: As the 20th century ended, Fusarium mycotoxicology entered the age of genomics. With complete genomes of Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides, and several Fusarium gene expression sequence databases on hand, researchers worldwide are working at a rapid pace to identify mycotoxin biosynthetic and regulatory genes. Seven classes of mycotoxin biosynthetic genes or gene clusters have been identified in Fusarium to date; four are polyketide synthase gene clusters for equisetin, fumonisins, fusarins, and zearalenones. Other Fusarium mycotoxin biosynthetic genes include a terpene cyclase gene cluster for trichothecenes, a cyclic peptide synthetase for enniatins, and a cytochrome P450 for butenolide. From the perspective of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the ultimate goal of research on Fusarium molecular biology is to reduce mycotoxins in cereal grains. With this goal in mind, efforts have focused on identifying aspects of mycotoxin biosynthesis and regulation that can be exploited for mycotoxin control. New information on fungal and plant genomes and gene expression will continue to provide information on genes important for fungal-plant interactions and will facilitate the development of targeted approaches for breeding and engineering crops for resistance to Fusarium infection and mycotoxin contamination.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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