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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED POSTHARVEST PHYTOSANITATION OF TEMPERATE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Title: Organic Quarantine Treatments for Tree Fruits

Author
item Neven, Lisa

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2006
Publication Date: February 1, 2008
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/15799
Citation: Neven, L.G. 2008. Organic Quarantine Treatments for Tree Fruits. HortScience Vol. 43(1)22-26.

Interpretive Summary: Organic production of pome and stone fruits in the United States has greatly increased over the past few years. In order to obtain export markets, these fruit must meet stringent quarantine requirements. For some countries, these requirements mean that the fruit must be treated with a chemical fumigant, which is not compliant with organic standards. Therefore, non-chemical quarantine treatments for organically produced pome and stone fruits have been developed by scientists at the USDA-ARS Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory in Wapato, WA using the CATTS, Controlled Atmosphere/Temperature Treatment System technology. This technology applies a short-term heat treatment under a low oxygen high carbon dioxide environment. These treatments have been shown to be effective in controlling the most prominent quarantine insect pests while maintaining commodity quality. The technology has progressed beyond laboratory-scale research units to 1 to 2 ton commercial units.

Technical Abstract: Organic production of pome and stone fruits in the United States has greatly increased over the past few years. In order to obtain lucrative export markets, these fruit must meet stringent quarantine requirements. For some countries, these requirements mean that the fruit must be treated with a chemical fumigant, which is not compliant with organic standards. Therefore, non-chemical quarantine treatments for organically produced pome and stone fruits have been developed using the CATTS, Controlled Atmosphere/Temperature Treatment System technology. This technology applies a short-term heat treatment under a low oxygen high carbon dioxide environment. These treatments have been shown to be effective in controlling the most prominent quarantine insect pests while maintaining commodity quality. The technology has progressed beyond laboratory-scale research units to 1 to 2 ton commercial units. The development of these treatments, their effect on both insect mortality and commodity quality are discussed.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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