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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONVERTING ALASKA FISH BY-PRODUCTS INTO VALUE ADDED INGREDIENTS AND PRODUCTS Title: Feeding soy or fish meal to Alaskan reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) - effects on animal performance and meat quality

Authors
item Finstadt, G - UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA
item Wicklund, E - UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA
item Long, K - UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA
item Rincker, P - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Oliveira, A - UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA
item Bechtel, Peter

Submitted to: Rangifer
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 30, 2007
Publication Date: May 22, 2007
Citation: Finstadt, G., Wicklund, E., Long, K., Rincker, P., Oliveira, A.C., Bechtel, P.J. 2007. Feeding soy or fish meal to Alaskan reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) - effects on animal performance and meat quality. Rangifer 27(1):59-75.

Interpretive Summary: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two different reindeer diets containing soybean meal or fishmeal as protein sources on animal growth performance, feed efficiency and ultimate meat quality. In the evaluation of meat quality, samples from free-ranging reindeer on the Seward Peninsula were included to provide comparisons with the traditional reindeer meat produced in Alaska. In addition, the chemical composition of raw and cooked reindeer meat was evaluated. No differences were found in live weight, carcass characteristics, meat pH, temperature decline, shear force, meat color or cooking loss when comparing the treatment groups. The meat samples from the free-range group had the highest amount of omega-3 fatty acids. The results from this experiment suggest there are no negative effects in either animal performance or meat quality characteristics by using fish meal as opposed to soybean meal as a protein supplement in a milled reindeer diet.

Technical Abstract: Fourteen reindeer were used to compare the effects of two different reindeer diets containing soybean meal (SBM) or fishmeal (WFM) as protein source) on animal growth performance, feed efficiency and ultimate meat quality. No significant difference was observed in overall weight gain between the WFM and SBM animals; however, the feed efficiency was higher for the reindeer fed the WFM mix. No differences were found in live weight, carcass characteristics, meat pH, temperature decline, shear force, meat color or cooking loss when comparing the treatment groups. The meat samples (M. longissimus) from the free-range group had the highest amount of omega-3 fatty acids and also the highest amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). No significant differences were found when the trained panel compared the sensory attributes of the meat. Off-flavor attributes related to “wild’ or “gamey” flavor was reported by consumers for samples from the WFM and free-range reindeer. No “fish-related” flavor was reported.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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