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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Quality Effects from the Addition of Moisture to Seed Cotton with Two Surfactants

Authors
item Byler, Richard
item Gamble, Gary
item Boykin Jr, James

Submitted to: Journal of Cotton Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 4, 2007
Publication Date: January 22, 2009
Citation: Byler, R.K., Gamble, G.R., Boykin Jr, J.C. 2009. Quality Effects from the Addition of Moisture to Seed Cotton with Two Surfactants. Journal of Cotton Science. 12: 345-356.

Interpretive Summary: Previously it has been shown that spraying atomized water on seed cotton that is drier than ideal in the gin will result in cotton fiber with longer fiber, less short fiber content and stronger fiber. Greater moisture addition resulted in increased quality. It is difficult to add much moisture to seed cotton in the gin partially because of the limited time available. Surfactants help water spread into fiber so this test was designed to use two surfactants with water to try to add additional moisture. Selected bales were also spun into yarn which was tested for quality. Moisture restoration of seed cotton with water including the surfactants tested did not materially affect the fiber or yarn in a significant way compared to moisture restoration with plain water. The seed cotton moisture restoration resulted in improved fiber length properties, lower fiber entanglements, and higher yarn strength but higher spinning waste. Improved fiber length quality resulting in improved yarn quality will make the cotton fiber more competitive in the marketplace.

Technical Abstract: Moisture restoration to seed cotton using an atomizing spray nozzle was shown to correlate with improved fiber length properties as measured by the Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS). A total of 54 bales were ginned with moisture restoration using an atomizing spray of water and water with two surfactants with samples taken for determination of moisture content and fiber properties. Three lots from seven bales were spun into yarn with samples taken for sliver and yarn property determination. The seed cotton moisture restoration was correlated with improved fiber length properties and yarn strength but higher waste. The use of surfactants did not materially affect the fiber or yarn in a significantly different way compared to moisture restoration with water alone.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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