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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Challenges and solutions for stripe rust control in the United States

Author
item CHEN, XIANMING

Submitted to: Australian Journal of Agricultural Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 9, 2006
Publication Date: June 1, 2007
Citation: Chen, X. 2007. Challenges and solutions for stripe rust control in the United States. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 58:648-655.

Interpretive Summary: Stripe rust of wheat has been one of the most destructive diseases on wheat in the western U.S. since late 1950s and has become increasingly important in the central and southeastern U.S. since 2000. Stripe rust of barley, a relatively new disease, has established and caused severe damages in the south central and western states since the pathogen was first reported in Texas in 1991. Stripe rusts of wheat and barley have been monitored by trap nurseries and field surveys. A total of 56 new races of the wheat stripe rust pathogen and 20 new races of the barley stripe rust pathogen have been identified since 2000. Germplasms and breeding lines of wheat and barley were tested in fields under natural infections and in the greenhouse with selected races of the pathogens. Genetics of stripe rust resistance in a numerous wheat and barley genotypes were determined and molecular markers for genes conferring all-stage and high-temperature, adult-plant (HTAP) resistance were developed. Control of stripe rust of wheat is currently relying on growing resistant cultivars and using foliar fungicides. Combinations of durable HTAP resistance with effective all-stage resistance should provide more effective stripe rust control and reduce use of fungicides.

Technical Abstract: Stripe rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has been one of the most destructive diseases on wheat in the western U.S. since late 1950s and has become increasingly important in the central and southeastern U.S. since 2000. Stripe rust of barley caused by P. striiformis f. sp. hordei, a relatively new disease, has established and caused severe damages in the south central and western states since the pathogen was first reported in Texas in 1991. Stripe rusts of wheat and barley have been monitored by trap nurseries and field surveys. Collections of stripe rusts from wheat, barley, triticale, and grasses were tested on a set of 20 wheat differential genotypes for identifying races of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici and a set of 12 barley differential genotypes for identifying races of P. striiformis f. sp. hordei. A total of 56 new races of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici and 20 new races of P. striiformis f. sp. hordei have been identified since 2000. Germplasms and breeding lines of wheat and barley were tested in fields under natural infections and in the greenhouse with selected races of the pathogens. Genetics of stripe rust resistance in a numerous wheat and barley genotypes were determined and molecular markers for genes conferring all-stage and high-temperature, adult-plant (HTAP) resistance were developed. Control of stripe rust of wheat is currently relying on growing resistant cultivars and using foliar fungicides. Combinations of durable HTAP resistance with effective all-stage resistance should provide more effective stripe rust control and reduce use of fungicides.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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