Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effect of Fiber Surface Sugar Content on Yarn Properties

Author
item Gamble, Gary

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2006
Publication Date: July 5, 2007
Citation: Gamble, G.R. 2007. The effect of fiber surface sugar content on yarn properties. National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference, January 9-12, 2007, New Orleans, Loiusiana. p.1793.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton subjected to extended periods of storage before being processed undergoes microbial degradation of surface sugars. This decrease in surface sugar content has been shown to be correlated with both an increase in yellowing as well as a decrease in resultant yarn strength. The present work describes the results of experimental procedures designed to further evaluate the effect of surface sugars on yarn properties under controlled conditions. A single variety of cotton stored for more than three years, with the result that sugar content decreased to very low levels, was subjected to spraying with a series of sugar solutions. The resultant cotton, as well as control which was not subjected to spraying, was subsequently spun into yarns and tested for a variety of yarn properties. Results indicate tha surface sugar content leads to enhanced yarn strength. An explanation of these results will be presented in terms of inter-fiber cohesive properties which are enhanced by the strong hydrogen bonding characteristics of sugars present on the surface of cotton fiber.

Technical Abstract: Previous work examining the effect of ageing on cotton fiber surface chemical and HVI properties, yarn processing performance, and yarn quality showed that cotton bales storage for at least two years exhibit signficant changes in a number of these variables including surface sugar content, HVI color grade, and yarn strength. The present work describes the results of experimental procedures designed to further evaluate the effect of surface sugars on yarn strength under controlled conditions. A single variety of cotton stored for more than three years, with the result that sugar content decreased to very low levels, was subjected to spraying with a series of sugar solutions. The resultant cotton as well as a control which was not subjected to spraying was subsequently spun into yarn which was subsequently subjected to breaking strength tests using the Statimat-M. Results indicate that enhanced surface sugar content leads to enhanced yarn strength. An explanation of these results will be presented in terms of inter-fiber cohesive properties which are enhanced by the strong hydrogen bonding characteristics of sugars present on the surface of cotton fiber.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page