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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Commercial Cotton Variety Spinning Study Hvi and Afis Spinning Relationship

Authors
item Foulk, Jonn
item Gamble, Gary
item Senter, Herman - CLEMSON UNIV.
item Meredith, William

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 10, 2007
Publication Date: July 5, 2007
Citation: Foulk, J.A., Gamble, G.R., Senter, H., Meredith Jr, W.R. 2007. Commercial cotton variety spinning study hvi and afis spinning relationship. 2007 Beltwide Cotton conference, January 9-12, 2007, New Orleans, Louisiana. p.1808. National Cotton Council, Memphis, Tennesse. Available: www.cotton.org/beltwide/proceedings.cfm

Interpretive Summary: United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service uses the High Volume Instrument to class all bales. Industry uses these results as well as fiber quality measurements obtained from the slower Advanced Fiber Information System. Our laboratory has completed a comprehensive study of the relationship of cotton fiber properties to the quality of spun yarn. A portion of the study evaluated HVI and AFIS fiber qualities and their impact on yarn using modern, high speed processing equipment. Cotton was spun into yarn at the CQRS laboratory by each of three spinning methods with characteristics of the yarn and spinning measured. This manuscript explores the common fiber quality measurements obtained from the HVI and AFIS and how well they help predict yarn quality and processing efficiencies.

Technical Abstract: In 2005, there were 22,638,247 Upland cotton bales classed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS). USDA-AMS uses the High Volume Instrument (HVI) to class all bales for fiber length, length uniformity, micronaire, strength, color (Rd and +b), trash, and leaf grade. Industry uses these results as well as fiber quality measurements obtained from a slower piece of testing equipment called the Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS). The Cotton Quality Research Station (CQRS) of the USDA-ARS, located in Clemson, South Carolina, has completed a comprehensive study of the relationship of cotton fiber properties to the quality of spun yarn. Cotton was grown and harvested from three of the largest producing growing regions (Georgia, Mississippi, and Texas) and subsequently ginned at their respective locations. A portion of the study evaluated HVI and AFIS fiber qualities and their impact on yarn using modern, high speed processing equipment. Cotton was spun into yarn at the CQRS laboratory by each of three spinning methods (ring, vortex and rotor spinning) with characteristics of the yarn and spinning measured. A previous manuscript detailed descriptive statistics and distributions for the fiber and yarn. This manuscript explores the common fiber quality measurements obtained from the HVI and AFIS and how well they help predict yarn quality and processing efficiencies.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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