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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Commercial Cotton Variety Spinning Study Quality Indices

Authors
item Foulk, Jonn
item Gamble, Gary
item Senter, Herman - CLEMSON UNIV
item Meredith, William

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 10, 2007
Publication Date: July 5, 2007
Citation: Foulk, J.A., Gamble, G.R., Senter, H., Meredith Jr, W.R. 2007. Commercial cotton variety spinning study quality indices. 2007 Beltwide Cotton Conference, January 9-12, 2007, New Orleans, Louisiana. p. 2013. National Cotton Council, Memphis, Tennesse. Available: www.cotton.org/beltwide/proceedings.cfm

Interpretive Summary: One major goal of this five year project is to determine an index of overall yarn quality based on cotton fiber properties. A second goal is to optimize the utilization of cotton for the cotton industry. Cotton cultivars are not bred for utility value with the exception of some properties measured using the HVI instrument. A portion of yarn variability is accounted for by various fiber properties which partially predict the physical properties of yarn and the success of spinning. Technological evolution in yarn manufacturing has resulted in rigorous demands for improved fiber qualities and a fiber utility value. Unfortunately, the commercialization of cotton cultivars is not contingent upon fiber quality or establishing a satisfactory fiber utility value. This manuscript will explore the development of a quality index and the means by which selection of cotton fiber qualities will help predict its ideal utilization.

Technical Abstract: The USDA-ARS Cotton Quality Research Station has completed a comprehensive study studying the relationship of cotton fiber properties to the quality of spun yarn. Cotton was spun into yarn at the CQRS laboratory by each of three spinning methods (ring, vortex and rotor spinning). Cotton in this study demonstrated fiber quality traits that allow them to operate at high speeds on the latest generation of spinning equipment. Cotton was grown and harvested in 2001-2005 from three of the largest producing growing regions (Georgia, Mississippi, and Texas)and subsequently ginned at their respective locations. Previous manuscripts have evaluated relationships between wide-ranging measurements of the raw cotton and yarn properties such as descriptive statistics and distributions, alsong with the impact of HVI and AFIS measurements on spinning, and finally the impact of exotic/supplementary measurements. One major goal of this five year period project is to deterine and index of overall yarn quality based on cotton fiber properties. A second goal is to optimize the utilization of cotton for the cotton industry. Cotton cultivars are not bred for utility value with the exception of some properties measured using the HVI instrument. A portion of yarn variability is accounted for by various fiber properties which partially predict the physical properties of yarn and the success of spinning. Technological evolution in yarn manufacturing has resulted in rigorous demands for improved fiber qualities and a fiber utility value. Unfortunately, the commercialization of cotton cultivars is not contingent upon fiber quality or establishing a satisfactory fiber utility value. This manuscript will explore the development of a quality index and the means by which selection of cotton fiber qualities will help predict its ideal utilization.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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