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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Cotton Trash Constituents

Authors
item Foulk, Jonn
item Gamble, Gary
item Allen, Angela

Submitted to: Proceedings of Pittcon Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 27, 2005
Publication Date: March 12, 2006
Citation: Foulk, J.A., Gamble, G.R., Allen, A.M. 2006. Cotton trash constituents [abstract]. Presented at the 2006 Pittcon Conference in Orlando, FL, March 12-17, 2006. Paper No. 1960-1. http://ca.pittcon.org/technical+program/tpabstra06.nsf/agenda+timeslotsweb/D30177C3160A492C8525705006F444B?open document

Interpretive Summary: Cotton plant trash samples were sequentially extracted using toluene, methanol, propanol, and water to detect botanical differences. The United States currently produces around 20 million bales of cotton that is subsequently classed (length, strength, fineness, color, and trash) for marketing and textile processing. Trash impacts every spinning system and removing plant debris such as the leaf, hull, stem, and seed is a challenge for high-speed textile spinning. Plant debris components were sequentially extracted via solvents with a range of polarity. Extracts were evaluated for conductivity along with ultraviolet visible, and FTIR spectroscopy. Techniques employed could provide a means for separating and identifying cotton trash. Extracts indicate differences exist between plant parts.

Technical Abstract: A series of cotton plant trash samples were sequentially extracted using toluene, methanol, propanol, and water to detect botanical differences. The United States currently produces around 20 million bales of cotton that is subsequently classed (length, strength, fineness, color, and trash) for marketing and textile processing. Geometric trash measurements provide a surface estimate of the total amount of trash in a bale but do not differentiate trash types. Mean size, size distribution, and trash type are all important characteristics that impact spinning performance. Trash impacts every spinning system and removing plant debris such as the leaf, hull, stem, and seed is a challenge for high-speed textile spinning. Trash is reduced in size through processing and one cannot visually differentiate trash types so other tests are required to determine problematic trash types. Plant debris components were sequentially extracted via solvents with a range of polarity. Extracts were evaluated for conductivity along with ultraviolet visible, and FTIR spectroscopy. Techniques employed could provide a means for separating and identifying cotton trash. Extracts indicate differences exist between plant parts.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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