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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CATFISH GENETICS, BREEDING, AND PHYSIOLOGY

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

Title: Evaluation of Growth and Disease Resistance of USDA103, USDA303, USDA102, and USDA102 X USDA103 Strains of Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

Authors
item PETERSON, BRIAN
item BOURGEOIS, LANIE
item BOSWORTH, BRIAN

Submitted to: Journal of the World Aquaculture Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 12, 2007
Publication Date: January 1, 2008
Citation: Peterson, B.C., Bourgeois, A.L., Bosworth, B.G. 2008. Evaluation of Growth and Disease Resistance of USDA103, USDA303, USDA102, and USDA102 X USDA103 Strains of Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Journal of the World Aquaculture Society 39:113-119.

Interpretive Summary: Growth and resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri (E. ictaluri), the bacterium that causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) were evaluated in four strains of USDA103, USDA303, USDA102, and USDA102 x USDA103 channel catfish. Differences in growth indices, feed conversion ratio, fillet to body weight index (FBI = weight of fillet (g)/weight of fish (g) x 100), and fillet and whole-body proximate composition were determined at the end of the study. Feed consumption and weight gain were highest in USDA103, USDA303, and USDA102 x USDA103 fish. USDA102 fish had a poorer feed conversion ratio compared to the other three strains of fish. The FBI, fillet and whole body content were similar among strains. In a second study, the four groups of catfish were challenged with E. ictaluri and mortality was recorded for 3 wks post-challenge. Survival was higher for USDA303 and USDA102 x USDA103 fish compared to the USDA103 and USDA102 strains of fish. Results of these studies suggest that continued selection of the USDA103 line and crossing this line of fish with lines of fish such as the USDA102 strain may produce fish with desirable growth and disease characteristics.

Technical Abstract: Technical Abstract Growth and resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri (E. ictaluri), the bacterium that causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) were evaluated in four strains of channel catfish. In the first study, USDA103, USDA303, USDA102, and USDA102 x USDA103 strains of channel catfish (average weight of 27.7 +/- 0.7 g/fish) were fed to visual satiety daily for 6 wks. Differences in growth indices, feed and protein efficiency, nitrogen retention, fillet to body weight index (FBI = weight of fillet (g)/weight of fish (g) x 100), and fillet and whole-body proximate composition were determined at the end of the study. Feed consumption and weight gain were highest in USDA103, USDA303, and USDA102 x USDA103 fish (P < 0.001). USDA102 fish had a poorer feed conversion ratio (P < 0.01) compared to the other three strains of fish. The FBI, fillet and whole body content were similar (P > 0.05) among strains when final weight was used as a covariate. USDA103, USDA303, and USDA102 x USDA103 strains had higher (P < 0.01) protein efficiency ratios compared to USDA102 while nitrogen retention from consumed protein was similar (P > 0.05) among strains. In a second study, the four groups of catfish (average weight of 22.2 +/- 1.9 g/fish) were challenged with E. ictaluri and mortality was recorded for 3 wks post-challenge. Survival was higher (P < 0.02) for USDA303 and USDA102 x USDA103 fish compared to the USDA103 and USDA102 strains of fish. Results of these studies demonstrate that the USDA103 and USDA303 strains of catfish are superior in growth performance to the USDA102 x USDA103 and USDA102 strains of fish. Results of the bacterial challenge show that the USDA303 and USDA102 x USDA103 strains of fish exhibited increased survival compared to the USDA103 and USDA102 strains of catfish. Continued selection of the USDA103 line and crossing this line of fish with lines of fish such as the USDA102 strain may produce fish with desirable growth and disease characteristics.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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