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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF IMPROVED MATERIALS FOR MYCOTOXIN ANALYSIS Title: Development of monoclonal antibodies for the Fusarin mycotoxins

Authors
item Maragos, Chris
item Busman, Mark
item Plattner, Ronald

Submitted to: Journal of Food Additives & Contaminants
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 13, 2007
Publication Date: January 10, 2008
Citation: Maragos, C.M., Busman, M., Plattner, R.D. 2008. Development of monoclonal antibodies for the Fusarin mycotoxins. Journal of Food Additives & Contaminants. 25(1):105-114.

Interpretive Summary: The fusarins are a group of mycotoxins produced by fungi that commonly infest cereal crops. One of these species of fungi, Fusarium verticillioides, also produces the fumonisin mycotoxins. The fusarins have been reported to be highly mutagenic and to have relatively poor chemical stability. In this manuscript we describe the development of antibodies capable of binding two types of fusarins (A and C), and immunoassays for their detection. The immunoassays are very sensitive, allowing ng/ml (part per billion) levels of these toxins to be detected in buffer, and may therefore allow for their future use in detecting fusarins in foods.

Technical Abstract: The fusarins are a group of mycotoxins produced by fungi that commonly infest cereal crops, in particular the fungus Fusarium verticillioides. This group of compounds is characterized by a substituted 2-pyrrolidone ring attached to a 12 carbon polyunsaturated backbone. Several of the fusarins contain an epoxide substitution on the pyrrolidone ring and are highly mutagenic. This paper describes the development of seven monoclonal antibodies and immunoassays for detecting fusarins C and A. Fusarin C was isolated and conjugated to ovalbumin to produce the immunogen. Competitive indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) were developed based upon the isolated monoclonal antibodies. The concentrations of fusarin C able to inhibit color development by 50% (IC50) in CI-ELISAs were 1.0, 2.0, 3.6, 23.4, 28.9, 31.4, and 66.7 ng ml-1 for clones 1-38, 1-30, 1-5, 1-7, 1-43, 1-25, and 1-21 respectively. Cross reactivity with fusarin A was 44.8%, 51.4%, 41.1%, 174%, 62.6%, 78.2%, and 98% for clones 1-38, 1-30, 1-5, 1-7, 1-43, 1-25, and 1-21 respectively. These antibodies may be useful for detecting fusarins at relevant levels in foods.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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