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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH FOR IMPROVING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND PRODUCER PROFITABILITY Title: Weed Hosts ROTYLENCHULUS RENIFORMIS in Cotton Fields Rotated With Corn in the Southeast of The United States

Authors
item Lawrence, K - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Price, Andrew
item Lawrence, G - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV.
item Jones, Jarrod
item Akridge, R - BREWTON EXP. STATION

Submitted to: Nematropica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 13, 2008
Publication Date: May 1, 2008
Citation: Lawrence, K.S., Price, A.J., Lawrence, G.W., Jones, J.R., Akridge, R. 2008. Weed hosts rotylenchulus reniformis in cotton fields rotated with corn in the Southeast of the United States. Nematropica. 38:13-22.

Interpretive Summary: The reniform nematode is the primary economically important nematode pest of cotton in the southern states of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Corn, a non-host to the reniform nematode, is the principal crop rotated with cotton to reduce reniform nematode populations. Recently, however, nematode soil samples collected have contained economically significant populations of reniform nematode after a season of corn. Non-controlled common weed species associated with a cotton - corn rotation may serve as hosts for reniform nematode and sustain populations during the corn crop season. In a microplot field study, corn and individual weed species populations were grown in mixture to evaluate reniform nematode population density changes. Corn was also produced under four herbicide regimes simulating various weed densities to determine if increasing weed populations would maintain or increase reniform nematode numbers. Of the 43 weed species tested, 79% of dicotyledonous weed species served as a host to reniform nematode while the monocotyledonous species tested did not. In the microplot trials, reniform nematode populations remained higher throughout the growing season in the cotton alone treatment compared to corn, and any treatment containing corn and weeds. Reniform nematode populations increased in the field plots with minimal herbicide applications and highest weed density as compared to the weed-free treatment.

Technical Abstract: The reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) is the primary economically important nematode pest of cotton (Gossypium hirisutum) in the southern states of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Corn (Zea mays), a non-host to R. reniformis, is the principal crop rotated with cotton to reduce R. reniformis populations. Recently, however, nematode soil samples collected have contained economically significant populations of R. reniformis after a season of corn. Non-controlled common weed species associated with a cotton - corn rotation may serve as hosts for R. reniformis and sustain populations during the corn crop season. Therefore, selected weed species commonly associated with corn production in the southeast United States were screened for their host status to R. reniformis in the greenhouse. In a microplot field study, corn and individual weed species populations were grown in mixture to evaluate R. reniformis population density changes. Corn was also produced under four herbicide regimes simulating various weed densities to determine if increasing weed populations would maintain or increase R. reniformis numbers. Of the 43 weed species tested, 79% of dicotyledonous weed species served as a host to R. reniformis while the monocotyledonous species tested did not. In the microplot trials, R. reniformis populations remained higher throughout the growing season in the cotton alone treatment compared to corn, and any treatment containing corn and weeds. Rotylenchulus reniformis populations increased in the field plots with minimal herbicide applications and highest weed density as compared to the weed-free treatment.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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