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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL APPLICATION OF AGRICULTURAL WASTE TO IMPROVE CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

Location: National Soil Dynamics Laboratory

Title: Clean Chip Residual Amended with Composted Poultry Litter as a Substrate for Lantana camara

Authors
item Boyer, C - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Gilliam, C - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Fain, G - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Gallagher, T - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item TORBERT, HENRY
item Sibley, J - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Southern Nursery Association Research Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 8, 2007
Publication Date: August 8, 2007
Citation: Boyer, C.R., Gilliam, C.H., Fain, G.B., Gallagher, T.V., Torbert, H.A., Sibley, J.L. 2007. Clean Chip Residual Amended with Composted Poultry Litter as a Substrate for Lantana camara. In: Proceedings of the Southern Nursery Association Research Conference, August 8-9, 2007, Atlanta, Georgia. 52:485-488.

Interpretive Summary: The rising costs for containerized nursery crop substrates (pine bark and peat) have driven the need for substrate research. Among the potential media resources is Clean Chip Residual (CCR), a by-product of the forestry industry. This material is produced during the harvest of “clean chips” for use in the paper industry. A study was established to examine the growth of Lantana plants in ten different substrates. Treatments contained either 100% pine bark (PB), 100% Clean Chip Residual (CCR) or a mixture of one of those materials with peat or composted poultry litter (CPL). Results show that all plants had similar growth to 100% pine bark at the conclusion of the study. Substrates containing CPL produced plants with darker leaves at 60 days after planting, but substrate shrinkage was evident with higher percentages of CPL. Plants grown in CCR were similar in size to plants grown in PB. This study indicates that freshly ground CCR may have potential as a sustainable and economical growth substrate for horticultural crops.

Technical Abstract: The rising costs for containerized nursery crop substrates (pine bark and peat) have driven the need for substrate research. Among the potential media resources is Clean Chip Residual (CCR), a by-product of the forestry industry. This material is produced during the harvest of “clean chips” for use in the paper industry. This “waste” is composed of approximately 49% wood, 9% needles, and 42% bark. Roughly 25% of the biomass at these production sites is CCR and the material is generally spread back over the site or sold to pulp mills for fuel. A study was established to examine the growth of Lantana camara ‘New Gold’ plants in ten different substrates. Treatments contained either 100% pine bark (PB), 100% Clean Chip Residual (CCR) or a mixture of one of those materials with peat or composted poultry litter (CPL). Treatments were mixed on a volume : volume ratio as follows: 100% PB, PB:CPL 3:1, PB:Peat 3:1, PB:CPL 7:1, PB:Peat 7:1, 100% CCR, CCR:CPL 3:1, CCR:Peat 3:1, CCR:CPL 7:1, and CCR:Peat 7:1. Results show that all plants had similar growth to 100% pine bark at the conclusion of the study. Substrates containing CPL produced plants with darker leaves at 60 days after planting, but substrate shrinkage was evident with higher percentages of CPL. Plants grown in CCR were similar in size to plants grown in PB. This study indicates that freshly ground CCR may have potential as a sustainable and economical growth substrate for horticultural crops.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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