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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCTION OF NUTRIENT LOSSES AND AERIAL EMISSIONS FROM LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION FACILITIES Title: Impact of Fibrous Coproducts From the Ethanol Industry on Pig Growth, Feed Efficiency, Health, and Carcass Characteristics

Authors
item Kerr, Brian
item Weber, Thomas

Submitted to: Swine Disease Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 9, 2007
Publication Date: November 9, 2007
Citation: Kerr, B.J., Weber, T.E. 2007. Impact of Fibrous Coproducts From the Ethanol Industry on Pig Growth, Feed Efficiency, Health, and Carcass Characteristics. In: Proceedings of 15th Annual Swine Disease Conference for Practitioners, November 8-9, 2007, Ames, Iowa. p. 87-90.

Technical Abstract: With the increasing production of biofuels from typical dietary energy sources, such as corn and vegetable oils, the interest in using alternative feedstuffs has grown. Further adding to this interest, is the increased production and availability of coproducts from the biofuels industry. Since the starch in the corn is being diverted to ethanol production, and it is likely that the remaining corn oil will be used for biodiesel production, there will be a large quantity of corn fiber available for feeding swine. Some coproducts currently derived from corn-based ethanol are relatively high in insoluble fiber. Because most previous studies in swine have been conducted using fiber derived from sources other than corn, there is relatively little data as to the effects of feeding corn fiber to swine. This article reviews the feeding of corn-derived fiber to swine on growth performance, intestinal health, and carcass characteristics. The research presented in these proceedings will be used to inform veterinary clinicians of issues they or their clients may encounter when utilizing biofuels coproducts in swine diets.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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