Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT OF NATURAL PRODUCTS FOR CONTROL OF PLANT DISEASES IN AGRICULTURE

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Bioactivity-Guided Fractionation and GC/MS Fingerprinting of Angelica sinensis and Angelica archangelica Root Components for Antifungal and Mosquito Deterrent Activity

Authors
item WEDGE, DAVID
item KLUN, JEROME
item Tabanca, Nurhayat
item Demirci, Betul - ANADOLU UNIVERSITY-TURKEY
item Ozek, Temel - ANADOLU UNIVERSITY-TURKEY
item Baser, K. Husnu Can - ANADOLU UNIVERSITY-TURKEY
item Liu, Zhijun - LOUISIANA STATE UNIV.
item Zhang, Sui - SHANGHAI ACADEMY-AG. SCI.
item CANTRELL, CHARLES
item Zhang, Jian - SHANGHAI INST. OF TECH.

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 18, 2008
Publication Date: February 1, 2009
Citation: Wedge, D.E., Klun, J.A., Tabanca, N., Demirci, B., Ozek, T., Baser, K., Liu, Z., Zhang, S., Cantrell, C.L., Zhang, J. 2009. Bioactivity-Guided Fractionation and GC/MS Fingerprinting of Angelica sinensis and Angelica archangelica Root Components for Antifungal and Mosquito Deterrent Activity. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 57(2):464-470.

Interpretive Summary: Plants used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) are commonly utilized directly or in dietary supplements throughout Asia. Angelica sinensis and A. archangelica have an important medicinal herb in China. Angelica sinensis has been used primarily as a general blood tonic and for gynecological disorders. Angelica. archangelica L. has been used in the treatment of gastric disorders. Phytochemically these species are very different and are often misidentified in the market and herbal shops and sold interchangeably and incorrectly. Therefore, we chose to investigate these two plants chemically and biologically in detail.

Technical Abstract: Angelica sinensis and A. archangelica belong to the Umbelliferae and both are used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gynecological and intestinal disorders. In this study, oils from three different A. sinensis collections and one A. archangelica root were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The dominant component was (Z)-ligustilide (61-69%) for three A. sinensis collections. Other two prominent compounds in A sinensis were (E)-3-butylidene phthalide (5.7- 9.8%) and (Z)-3-butylidene phthalide (1.5- 2.3%). The largest part of the A. archangelica oil was comprised of monoterpene hydrocarbons such as alpha-pinene (24.5%), delta-3-carene (13.8%), beta-phellandrene (10.1%), p-cymene (8.8%), limonene (8.4%) and sabinene (6.3%). Phthalides and monoterpene hydrocarbons were determined to be good systematic markers or chemical fingerprints for A. sinensis and A. archangelica root oils. A non-polar antifungal compound was isolated from active chloroform fraction by bioassay-guided fractionation using the Colletotrichum direct-bioautography assay. (Z)-ligustilide was subsequently identified as the active compound by GC/MS, 1H, and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. (Z)-Ligustilide showed moderate antifungal activity against anthracnose causing three Colletotrichum species. (Z)-Ligustilide deterred the biting of two mosquito species more effectively than Deet.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page