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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic analysis of agronomic and fiber traits using four interspecific chromosome substitution lines

Authors
item Saha, Sukumar
item Jenkins, Johnie
item Wu, J - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item McCarty, Jack
item Stelly, D - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Plant Breeding
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 22, 2008
Publication Date: December 1, 2008
Citation: Saha, S., Jenkins, J.N., Wu, J., McCarty Jr., J.C., Stelly, D.M. 2008. Genetic analysis of agronomic and fiber traits using four interspecific chromosome substitution lines in cotton. Plant Breeding. 127:612-618.

Interpretive Summary: Two of the important limiting factors in the genetic improvement of cotton are: 1) the lack of information about genes that control important traits and 2) lack of easy to use diverse germplasm. Recently, we have developed a series of 17 backcrossed chromosome substitution lines (CS-B) where a homologous pair of chromosomes or chromosome arms, from G. barbadense (Pima 3-79) germplasm, are substituted for the homologous G. hirsutum (TM-1) chromosomes or chromosome arms. These lines provide an ideal opportunity to associate important fiber and agronomic traits with individual chromosomes or chromosome arms. These CS-B lines are also useful as parents for introgressing favorable genes from specific G. barbadense chromosomes into improved Upland cultivars. This study is designed to evaluate the effect of a chromosome or chromosome segment of four backcrossed chromosome or chromosome arm substitution lines (2n=52) including chromosomes 01, 11sh (chromosome 11 short arm), 12 sh, and 26 Lo (chromosome 26 long arm) from G. barbadense, on fiber and agronomic traits in the G. hirsutum genome, and provides useful genetic information useful for cotton breeding and genetic studies. Data for boll size, lint percentage, micronaire, 2.5% span length, elongation, strength and yield were collected from four replicated field experiments at two different locations in two years, and analyzed under an additive dominance (AD) genetic model with genotype and environment interaction. Our chromosomal assignment of the QTLs generally agreed with other published map information. The presence of significant negative additive effects in micronaire with CS-B 01 and significant positive additive effects in elongation and fiber strength with CS-B11sh suggested the substituted chromosome arms of 3-79 in these CS-B lines were probably causing these effects. CS-B lines provided valuable information on the effects of an alien species chromosome or chromosome arm on fiber and agronomic traits in Upland cotton.

Technical Abstract: Two of the primary impeding forces in the genetic improvement of cotton are: 1) the lack of information about genes that control important traits and 2) lack of an easy way to use diverse germplasm. Chromosome substitution lines can be useful resources to provide comprehensive genomic information of important fiber and agronomic traits and to enhance germplasm of Upland cotton. Recently we have developed a series of backcrossed chromosome substitution lines (CS-B) with a homologous pair of chromosome or chromosome arms of G. barbadense (3-79) germplasm substituted for the homologous G. hirsutum (TM-1) chromosomes or chromosome segments. The backcrossed chromosome substitution lines are genetically similar to TM-1, an Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) genetic standard, and to each other, except that each line differs by the replacement of a specific homologous pair of chromosomes or chromosome segments from the donor alien species. The overall goal of this paper is to report on agronomic and fiber trait performance of four euploid (2n=52) backcrossed chromosome or chromosome arm substitution lines including chromosomes 01, 11sh (chromosome 11 short arm), 12 sh, and 26 Lo (chromosome 26 long arm). Data for yield, boll size, lint percentage, micronaire, 2.5% span length, elongation, and strength were collected from four replicated field experiments at two different locations in two years and analyzed under an additive dominance (AD) genetic model with genotype and environment interaction. Our chromosomal assignment of effects generally agreed with published map information. CS-B 12sh had higher, while CS-B 01 and CS-B 26Lo had lower boll weight than TM-1. Results showed that CS-B 26Lo had significant negative homozygous dominance effect, but high positive heterozygous dominance effect on seedcotton and lint yields. The presence of significant negative additive effects for micronaire with CS-B 01 and significant positive additive effects for elongation and fiber strength with CS-B11sh suggested the substituted chromosome arms of 3-79 in these CS-B lines were more likely carrying genes causing these effects. CS-B lines provided valuable information on the effects of an alien species chromosome or chromosome arm on fiber and agronomic traits in Upland cotton. These CS-B lines also provide novel genetic resources for improving Upland cotton germplasm.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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