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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENOMIC AND FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE MUCOSAL IMMUNE RESPONSE AND ITS ROLE IN PROTECTION AGAINST RESPIRATORY PATHOGENS IN POULTRY

Location: Exotic and Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research Unit

Title: Comparison of inactivated H3 avian influenza vaccines to protect turkey hens against egg production losses following challenge with a recent H3N2 field isolate

Authors
item Kapczynski, Darrell
item Liljebjelke, Karen
item Gonder, Eric - GOLDSBORO MILLING CO
item Lippert, Ron - WILLMAR POULTRY CO
item Tilley, Becky - GOLDSBORO MILLING CO

Submitted to: World Poultry Congress Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 6, 2007
Publication Date: June 30, 2008
Citation: Kapczynski, D.R., Liljebjelke, K.A., Gonder, E., Lippert, R., Tilley, B. 2008. Comparison of inactivated H3 avian influenza vaccines to protect turkey hens against egg production losses following challenge with a recent H3N2 field isolate [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the 23rd World Poultry Congress, June 29-July 4, 2008, Brisbane, Australia. CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Recently, triple reassortant H3N2 subtype avian influenza (AI) viruses containing gene segments of avian, swine, and human origin appeared in both swine and turkey populations in the U.S. These H3N2 viruses appear to be responsible for significant turkey production losses, primarily in Minnesota and North Carolina. Infection of turkey breeder hens with these viruses primarily causes decreased egg production and quality. The objectives of this research were to determine if two currently available killed H3 subtype AI commercial vaccines protect laying breeding hens from egg production losses following experimental challenge with an H3N2 (2003) AI field virus isolated from turkeys in North Carolina. Groups of commercial turkeys hens received two field vaccinations in North Carolina with either an inactivated H3N4 (1979) or H3N2 (2003) oil emulsion vaccine and were transported to SEPRL for challenge at 32 weeks of age. Results indicate following vaccination and challenge, serum antibody responses were detected against the challenge virus in all groups of birds, which were significantly higher than sham-vaccinated and challenged hens. Birds receiving the H3N2 vaccine (62%) were better protected from egg production losses compared to either the H3N4 (38%) or sham-vaccinated birds (32 %). Overall, these results indicate that the more recent and genetically matched H3N2 vaccine provided increased protection from production losses.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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