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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Impact of rolling and phosphorous acid on root rot of dry peas in the Pacific Northwest

Authors
item PORTER, LYNDON
item COFFMAN, VIRGINIA

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2007
Publication Date: July 1, 2007
Citation: Porter, L., Coffman, V.A. 2007. Impact of rolling and phosphorous acid on root rot of dry peas in the Pacific Northwest. Phytopathology. 97:S94

Technical Abstract: Rolling soil after planting is standard in dry pea production areas in the Pacific Northwest but can increase compaction resulting in increase of root rot by oomycetes and other pathogens. Phosphorous acid has been used to manage oomycete pathogens, therefore, the impact of not rolling soil after seeding, and foliar applications of phosphorous acid (Phostrol) on stand counts, plant height, root disease and yield of Aerial (A) and Columbian (C) dry peas was assessed in Moscow (Mo) and Kendrick (Ke), Idaho. Rolling soil significantly (P < 0.05) improved stand counts for A and C in Mo compared to non-rolled soil but significantly reduced stand counts for A but not C in Ke. Root disease of non-treated seed of A was significantly less than the control (rolled soil & treated seed) when a foliar application of phosphorous acid was applied at 2.9 L/h and the soil was non-rolled, and at 4.7 L/h when soil was rolled, in Mo and Ke, respectively. Plant height of A was significantly greater than the control at both sites when a foliar application of phosphorous acid was applied at 2.9 L/h and soil was rolled. Yield of C and A were numerically greater than the control when soil was non-rolled in Ke or rolled in Mo and a foliar application of phosphorous acid was applied at 2.9 L/h. Phosphorous acid positively affected pea health, while rolling varied in its impact on health.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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