Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: COUNTERMEASURES TO PREVENT AND CONTROL AVIAN MYCOPLASMOSIS

Location: Poultry Research

Title: Stabilization of live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines during vaccination with second generation Spray-Vac® vaccine stabilizer

Authors
item Leigh, Spencer
item Branton, Scott
item Collier, Stephanie

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Poultry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 21, 2008
Publication Date: June 15, 2008
Citation: Leigh, S.A., Branton, S.L., Collier, S.D. 2008. Stabilization of live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines during vaccination with second generation Spray-Vac® vaccine stabilizer. Journal of Applied Poultry Research 17:278-282.

Interpretive Summary: Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a cause of chronic respiratory disease of chickens and infectious sinusitis of turkeys. MG infections result in major economic losses for poultry producers, estimated at greater than 150 million dollars annually. Although three live MG vaccines are available, standardized methods to apply these vaccines and obtain consistent results have not been established. Second generation Spray-Vac® vaccine stabilizer was developed and tested for its ability to protect MG vaccines from osmotic lysis and the harmful effects of chlorine in public water supplies. The results show that it protects live MG vaccines from both osmotic lysis and oxidizing compounds such as chlorine. This product allows poultry producers to use any available water source for vaccine rehydration/dilution, removing the need for storing large quantities of distilled water and resulting in a cost saving to the end user. It also results in increased vaccine viability, resulting in a more consistent application of MG vaccines and therefore enhanced protection for commercial layer flocks.

Technical Abstract: Dilutions and application of live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines without the use of vaccine stabilizing compounds may lead to significant loss of vaccine viability and loss of vaccine efficacy. Vaccine viability may decreases due to osmotic lysis of the mycoplasma as well as the presence of chlorine or other detrimental chemicals in the water. Second generation Spray-Vac® vaccine stabilizer was developed and shown to maintain live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine viability during exposure to chlorine while protecting from the other factors that appear to decrease vaccine survival in solution. Increased vaccine survival in solution should lead to increased survival of the vaccine during vaccination. Field trial results demonstrate that second generation Spray-Vac® vaccine stabilizer yields excellent results without the need for distilled water or other vaccine stabilizing compounds.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page