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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF MOTHS, LEAFHOPPERS, AND TRUE BUGS OF IMPORTANCE TO AGRICULTURAL, FOREST, AND ORNAMENTAL PLANTS Title: A new pest species of Copitarsia Hampson from the Neotropical Region feeding on Asparagus and cut flowers (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

Authors
item Pogue, Michael
item Simmons, Rebecca - UNIV. OF NORTH DAKOTA

Submitted to: Annals of the Entomological Society of America
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 29, 2008
Publication Date: July 31, 2008
Citation: Pogue, M.G., Simmons, R. 2008. A new pest species of Copitarsia Hampson from the Neotropical Region feeding on Asparagus and cut flowers (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 101:743-762.

Interpretive Summary: The family Noctuidae, commonly called Owlet moths, represents the largest family of moths and contains more agriculturally important species than any other family of moths. Many owlet moths, such as armyworms, cutworms, corn earworms, and bud worms, do billions of dollars damage to crops worldwide. This report describes a new pest species of owlet moth from Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru that feeds on Asparagus and numerous species of imported cut flowers. In this paper, we describe and illustrate the egg, larva, pupa, and adult to help distinguish it from other closely related species. This information will be useful to all entomological researchers, APHIS scientists and identifiers, forest service scientists, and other agricultural specialists from the United States, Mexico, and South America.

Technical Abstract: The egg, first- and last- instar larva, and adult of Copitarsia corruda, n. sp. from Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru are described and illustrated. Larval host-plant genera include Asparagus (Liliaceae) (Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador), Iris (Iridaceae) (Ecuador), Ammi (Apiaceae) (Ecuador), Lysimachia (Primulaceae) (Colombia), Callistephus (Colombia) (Asteraceae), and Aster (Colombia) (Asteraceae). The larva of Copitarsia decolora (Guenée) is described and illustrated. In addition to genitalic and larval characters, mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (COI) was analyzed to differentiate C. corruda from C. decolora. The subfamilial placement of Copitarsia in Noctuinae was based on morphological characters and analysis of EFI?.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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