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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Delay Processing of Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) Byproducts into Fishmeal

Authors
item Wu, Ted
item Bechtel, Peter
item Bower, Cynthia

Submitted to: Journal of Aquatic Food Product Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 15, 2009
Publication Date: October 20, 2009
Citation: Wu, T.H., Bechtel, P.J., Bower, C.K. 2009. Effects of Delay Processing of Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) Byproducts into Fishmeal. Journal of Aquatic Food Product Technology. 18(4):345-359.

Interpretive Summary: The effects of temperature and storage on raw pink salmon heads and viscera were evaluated to determine the quality of fish meal processed. The raw byproducts were stored at 6C from 0-10 days and 15C from 0-4 days. During each day the raw byproducts were processed into fish meal. Nutritional and chemical analyses were performed on the raw and processed byproducts. The initial starting raw byproducts had values of total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N) at 36 mg N/ 100g, histamine at 4.2 mg/kg and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1.9 mg malonaldehyde (MDA)/kg, respectively. TVB-N values indicated substantial spoilage by day 2 at 15'C and day 6 at 6C. Most biogenic amine concentrations of raw byproduct stored at 15C increased at day 1 and by day 2 there were many significant differences. For byproducts stored at 6C changes in biogenic amine were evident by day 2 and by day 6 elevated levels were noted in most biogenic amines. The TBARS values of the raw material stored at 15C started showing changes at day 3 and at 6C on day 4. There was little temperature dependence for lipid oxidation associated with the respective temperatures. No great differences in fish meals processed from byproducts were noted in the amino acid profile with storage time or temperature changes. Biogenic amines in fish meals suggested some changes occurring between day 0 and storage by day 3 at 15C and storage by day 6 at 6C. TBARS values in the fish meal at day 2 for both 15C and 6C showed significant changed from the starting material. While chemical indications suggested spoilage of the byproducts with increased storage and temperatures, a low quality meal can still be produced with adequate amino acids and essential minerals.

Technical Abstract: The effects of temperature and storage on raw pink salmon heads and viscera were evaluated to determine the quality of fish meal processed. The raw byproducts were stored at 6C from 0-10 days and 15C from 0-4 days. During each day the raw byproducts were processed into fish meal. Nutritional and chemical analyses were performed on the raw and processed byproducts. The initial starting raw byproducts had values of total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N) at 36 mg N/100g, histamine at 4.2 mg/kg and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1.9 mg malonaldehyde (MDA)/kg, respectively. TVB-N values indicated substantial spoilage by day 2 at 15C and day 6 at 6C. Most biogenic amine concentrations of raw byproduct stored at 15C increased at day 1 and by day 2 there were many significant differences. For byproducts stored at 6C changes in biogenic amine were evident by day 2 and by day 6 elevated levels were noted in most biogenic amines. The TBARS values of the raw material stored at 15C started showing changes at day 3 and at 6C on day 4. There was little temperature dependence for lipid oxidation associated with the respective temperatures. No great differences in fish meals processed from byproducts were noted in the amino acid profile with storage time or temperature changes. Biogenic amines in fish meals suggested some changes occurring between day 0 and storage by day 3 at 15C and storage by day 6 at 6C. TBARS values in the fish meal at day 2 for both 15C and 6C showed significant changed from the starting material. While chemical indications suggested spoilage of the byproducts with increased storage and temperatures, a low quality meal can still be produced with adequate amino acids and essential minerals.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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