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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOYBEAN DISEASE AND PEST MANAGEMENT Title: Evaluation of soybean germplasm accessions to soybean rust in the southeastern United States and efforts to develop rust-resistant lines

Authors
item Walker, David
item Nelson, Randall
item Hartman, Glen
item Buckley, J Blair - LOUISIANA STATE UNIV.
item Moore, Steven - LOUISIANA STATE UNIV.
item Schneider, Raymond - LOUISIANA STATE UNIV.
item Weaver, David - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Shipe, Emerson - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
item Mueller, John - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
item Boerma, H Roger - UNIV. OF GEORGIA

Submitted to: International Crop Science Congress Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2008
Publication Date: April 15, 2008
Citation: Walker, D.R., Nelson, R.L., Hartman, G.L., Buckley, J., Moore, S.H., Schneider, R.W., Weaver, D.B., Shipe, E.R., Mueller, J.D., Boerma, H. 2008. Evaluation of soybean germplasm accessions to soybean rust in the southeastern United States and efforts to develop rust-resistant lines. [Abstract]. International Crop Science Congress Proceedings, April 13-18, 2008, Jeju, Korea. Abstract #1532.

Technical Abstract: Identification and evaluation of resistance to soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) is complicated by interactions among host and pathogen genotypes, environmental factors, mechanisms of resistance, and the increased susceptibility of reproductive-stage plants. Resistance can involve lesion type, disease incidence and severity, level of sporulation from uredinia, and rate of lesion development. Since the appearance of soybean rust in North America in November, 2004, field and greenhouse tests have been conducted in the southeastern United States to screen accessions from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s soybean germplasm collection. On the basis of data from five locations in 2007, about 85 accessions appear to have useful levels of resistance to rust. Many of these have been or are being crossed to high-yielding lines to develop populations for breeding resistant lines and for mapping resistance genes using DNA markers. Transfer of resistant genes into agronomically superior genetic backgrounds and tagging these genes with markers will provide soybean breeders with the tools needed to develop rust-resistant cultivars.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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